(c) all rights reserved · fauna · haibun · nature · poetry

Spring Housekeeping

bluebird house 032520

One of the house sliders is open to the air today. I walked out to the mailbox and once again looked at the fence post falling backward near the road, bluebird box attached. Another reminder to get this and the other three ready for their annual visitors.

I came inside and found two screwdrivers; one to move metal “L” aside to open and clean the boxes, and one to unscrew the ones that needed moving from the posts. I removed the house, still attached to the long board, and relocated it to a sheltered area, facing east, near the garage. One down. The next two only needed to be opened and cleaned out, easy peasy. The last one was unscrewed from another drifting fence post (the land here shifts) and was relocated to a more solid one blessed enough to be near a scrub tree trunk. I cleaned it out, wedged it between post and trunk, then secured it with zip-ties.

Sun shining, slow breeze
One by one, units swept clean –
Old makes way for new.

12 thoughts on “Spring Housekeeping

    1. It felt great to get that taken care of! Every day I saw that thing and knew no baby birds would make it if it fell over. Most of the fence posts in the yard and along the property need to be replaced 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I’ve got a little wren or sparrow house without anyway to clean it out. Won’t the birds to that? I thought I saw a sparrow go in it this spring.
    I’m hoping that some of the nests I see in my trees are for birds. Though I know some are squirrels homes. Might be a good day if the sun stays out to work on my raised garden.

    You’ve got some lucky birds! One of my children have owl boxes. I only ever saw an owl once – it was during the day – I think it was a young one that fell out of the tree – I talked to it for about ten minutes 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jules, I don’t know about other bird houses, but the bluebird boxes come with a way to clean them out easily. I have left them occasionally without, and when finally did, they just build on top of what’s already there; and depending on the species, it will be made of different things. The risk with not cleaning them out is insects and disease can cultivate in the the old stuff. Last year there was an infestation of red ants in one of the boxes, and I’m sure they would harm the helpless babies.

      Jules, if they are already building this season, I wouldn’t mess with it right now, but after the babies have fledged, find a way to open it up (screwdrivers, hammers, etc), and clean it out. It may be trouble to get it put back together, but worth it for the birds.

      Your child having an owl box is so wonderful. I wonder if they sell them at the store? Maybe I could get one of my sons to build one for me. And you had a chance for conversation with an owlet. How many can say that??

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I did write about it somewhere… but that was awhile ago. I’ve been here about 30 years – could have been 10 or even 20 years ago.

        One year I got a book for my son – how tot build bird houses. 🙂 He’d already had built some before then. The house I have is a one piece molded thing. Guess I’d need tweezers or a pare of needle nose pliers to get the old stuff out. I think the opening is to small for the squirrels. The wood work the inside is up pretty high as well, for protection (that the birds built.

        Mostly I just feed the birds and squirrels. And by default the hawks….

        One year I also found an albino or white luna moth… in its last days. “Luna moths are not rare, but are rarely seen due to their very brief (7–10 day) adult lives and nocturnal flying time. As with all giant silk moths, the adults do not eat, and thus are not seen visiting flowers.” Most I think are that light greenish hue. I might have an old photo somewhere… But that too, was years before digital I think.

        I bet you could get most bird boxes online… my favorite bird store is closed. I had to get birdseed from the mega pet food store.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Jules, the one piece molded house sounds like no ventilation which probably isn’t the greatest. Depending the thickness and the tools you have on hand, you might be able to cut a small hole in the side, remove the debris, then put a breathable patch on it.

          So far my seed store has curbside service if you order ahead online and may still be open to walk-ins. Haven’t tried to go there since this all came about.

          Liked by 1 person

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