TSM 229 & Friday Writings 45– Hymns March


“See the Light” by Giulio Bernardi

How neatly click blocks as
they form the walls of box
container; clay, baked dust
pads prison, hope long flown,
left to airless midnights.

The keeper’s metals clank
thrice bringing tasteless gruel;
little more than corpse fuel
and sensory morsels.
Heat of stones tell seasons.

At times I’m graced with dreams;
playing xylophone ribs
is able to call them —
black turns to shadow, then
sun’s light begins to grow

bright on my closed eyelids.
I open them and see!
Hymns march across beams as
my music spirits church
again – before the war.

Dedicated to Prisoners of War

Carrie is the host of The Sunday Muse.

Also linked to Poets and Storytellers United:  Friday Writings

53 Comments Add yours

  1. Rob Kistner says:

    Strong piece Lisa. Had a wonderful reverent essence my friend… 🙂✌🏼❤️

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rob, thanks much! ❤

      Like

  2. Sunra Rainz says:

    Such an evocative piece, Lisa. It really tells of the traces left behind by events and how that energy never really goes away. Not least the power of memories.

    By the way, if you wanted, you could also link this piece to Poets and Storytellers United as their theme this week is war and peace.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Sunra. What’s the link to there?

      Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Thank you, Sunra!

          Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Lisa.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. memadtwo says:

    Too many behind bars…vividly rendered. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Kerfe, yes there are.

      Like

  4. Sadje says:

    A powerful, evocative poem Li.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Sadje.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        You’re most welcome

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Badfinger (Max) says:

    playing xylophone ribs I like that Lisa…some great lines in it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Max! It’s the kind of poem that can be interpreted in several ways.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Badfinger (Max) says:

        I’ve noticed that about some poems. I always wonder if I’m interpreting it the right way…but I guess in some…there is no right way.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Well said, Max. I think that the final piece in any poem “puzzle” is the reader’s perspective.

          Liked by 1 person

  6. Jim says:

    MSJADELI, when war is over, two things to watch for.
    1. Peace and calmness, and
    2. Another hostility sprouting, perhaps into another war.
    Thank you, for peeking in on me. Yes, a little mild for expecting death, but that is me, I am old and am fairly ready. Of course I’d like to live longer than my dad, he was 96 when he died, almost 97. I am getting there fast seems to me. But It’s okay, someone else can have my place. here. For a several years I’ve been l’ve been telling folk that I’ve done every thing that I need to do and have done most everythings that I’ve liked to do.
    ..

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Jim, it is uplifting to read your philosophy about it. What was it that you think kept your dad wanting to live?

      Like

  7. Thanks for linking to P&SU. Very much on topic, yes. I see how that amazing picture can inspire both aspects you write of.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You’re welcome, Rosemary.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. wyndolynne says:

    Visceral sense of unwarranted imprisonment, the misuse of spaces for warehousing people.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      YES. Too many who are imprisoned have no place being there, whereas too many who belong behind bars walk free 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Gillena Cox says:

    How dedpair lingers in the walls of the prisons that war builds is strongly enscripted here

    Bravo

    Much💛love

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks much, Gillena, and what a great word, enscripted.

      Like

  10. Helen says:

    A gripping, chilling poem .. I am reminded of John McCain and the countless others who endured what you have shared ~~ so eloquently.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Helen, many thanks. My heart goes out to those who have suffered in such a way.

      Like

  11. Hi Lisa. Thanks for sharing these beautiful words. The image of sun streaming through the window is the perfect illustration for it too. Hugs on the wing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for the feedback and you’re welcome.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Truedessa says:

    Thank goodness or the light that shines into these dark walls. sigh..too many wars too many prisoners.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. dorahak says:

    So grace-fully done, Lisa.
    ~Dora

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Dora thank you very much. The light feels like God reaching in…

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Carrie V. H. says:

    I love the idea of a hymn marching across a beam of light. This is some amazing writing Lisa and the ending is stunning!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Carrie, thank you very much. I wish it could reach each prisoner of war.

      Like

  15. A pretty bleak poem. But I guess when it comes to POWs, sadly, bleakness is the reality!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes it is and yes it is. Thanks for reading, Christian.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. A powerful poem. I get a sense of hope.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, I’m glad you do.

      Like

  17. Strong images, Lisa. As Truedessa says, thank goodness for the light in such dark times.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Marion, thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Seems like light is always a gift even when its function isn’t about breaking up the darkness.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      YES. Imagine the first human who discovered fire.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I wish I knew precisely how that went.
        I remember enjoying how The Jungle Book (2016) depicted how animals perceived fire the first time they saw it. I hadn’t even thought about it until then.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Connecting this to the other post, I’m guessing it was by lightning, and one of them said, how do we tame this thing 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I think you’re right. Especially when they realised that fire couldn’t literally chase them.

            Liked by 1 person

  19. Thank goodness for the light.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Powerful poem, Lisa. Sometimes the light finds us.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Jim says:

    Sunlight beams are meant for daydreaming. Thanks for stopping by. I will say that boys starting with “A” and could never twist another 26 turns to get back. Higher letter guys didn’t stand a chance either.
    ..

    Liked by 1 person

  22. this is superb writing Lisa! 💗

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Cindy, thank you very much!

      Like

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