dverse · love · nature · pantoum · poetry

dVerse — A time to be born, and a time to die

a time to be born and a time to die

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Lillian is the host of dVerse today. Lillian says:

Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 American Standard Version (ASV)For everything there is a season, and a time for every [a]purpose under heaven: 2 a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted; 3 a time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up; 4 a time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance; 5 a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing; 6 a time to seek, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away; 7 a time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak; 8 a time to love, and a time to hate; a time for war, and a time for peace.

So – morphing into today’s prompt, I’d like you to do one of three things:
1) pick one or two of the times mentioned in the Ecclesiastes quotation and include it/them word for word, in a poem;
OR 2) pick one or two of the times mentioned in the Ecclesiastes quotation and let it/them motivate your poem – no need to mention it/them word for word but we should be able to identify the reference;
OR 3) create your own time frame and write a poem that includes the words “a time to _____________” OR “a time for _____________” (you fill in the blank).

OK, I chose to write on part of Ecclesiastes 3:2, “a time to be born, and a time to die”. Depending on how you want to look at it the rest of the verse “a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted” may be inferred by how one chooses to live their life.

This is also an imperfect pantoum, so I will probably link it in the pantoum challenge for the month.

A Time to be Born, and a Time to Die

 

Sprung from mysterious mother

One of the ten thousand* things

You, who are you, not other

Rise, who you are, with your wings

 

One of the ten thousand things

Born to connect with the rest

Rise, who you are, with your wings

Soar vistas as you leave your nest

 

Born to connect with the rest

As the winds control ebb and flow

Soar vistas as you leave your nest

With your flock, migrate from snow

 

As the winds control ebb and flow

You’ll live for a bit in the warm

With your flock migrated from snow

Rest in peace, where there’s no harm

 

You lived for a while in the warm

Flying and learning to love others

Now it’s time, in the ways of transform,

To return to mysterious mother

 

*the 10,000 things is not to be taken literally.  look here for more information

35 thoughts on “dVerse — A time to be born, and a time to die

  1. …a time to be born….to rise with wings….to leave the nest to soar…
    and death seen as a transformation, a return to the mysterious mother.
    One of the ten thousand things….
    This, to me, is mythical.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. You touch and connect to so much with these words, nature, great birds, birth, death as a doorway; magically poetically metaphysical. I feel like one of quad-zillions though, unumberable.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. a term in Chinese philosophy that encompasses “all that is” — and that includes alive and dead — as “the 10,000 things”, so it applies to you. i will add that as a note in the pantoum section

    Like

  4. Pantoums always remind me of the line by Khayyam … “but evermore came out the same door as in I went”. You’ve mastered the form, however.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Beverly, it’s based on philosophical daoism, where it talks about the mysterious mother, from which all things spring and to which all things return. Thank you for the kind words. I want to do more pantoum!

    Like

  6. This is a really sweeping, soaring poem. The idea behind it is magnificent and it makes a good pantoum too.
    I wondered if in the first line of the last stanza, substituting ‘while’ for ‘bit’ might sound better. There’s the alliteration too. Bit is a snappy sort of word to my ear 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. firstly on the poetics, you dealt with a difficult theme and dealt with it with much grandeur, love how it just takes off and soars. i would lose the word bit, maybe use “time” for more effect. and this is your best pantoum and one of the best I have read thus far, you keep to form and a classic example of the imperfect pantoum – the resolution at the end is brilliant. it could not have been done better. Jade you inspire me!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I started reading them in around 1995. My favorite is Witter Bynner’s, which is also very poetic. There are a lot of good ones out there. I think I read it is the 2nd most translated work after The Bible but am not sure that’s true or not.

    Liked by 1 person

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