(c) all rights reserved · friendship · love · music

#MM Music Challenge — Soul Deep — George Harrison’s I’d Have you Anytime

New MM Music Badge

Jim Adams is the dedicated host of Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie Music Challenge.  Jim says:
The challenge today is to focus on [Baby I Love Your Way] and use it for inspiration in any form of creative expression (including but not limited to short stories, a piece of flash fiction, poems, lyrics, artwork, photography, (etc.) that you can share with the writing community.

My essay is after the song information, video, and lyrics.

Image result for george harrison and bob dylan
link that goes to a youtube documentary

I’d Have You Anytime” is a song written by George Harrison and Bob Dylan, released in 1970 as the opening track of Harrison’s first post-Beatles solo album, All Things Must Pass. The pair wrote the song at Dylan’s home in Bearsville, near Woodstock in upstate New York, in November 1968. Its creation occurred during a period when Harrison had outgrown his role in the Beatles and Dylan had withdrawn from the pressures of fame to raise a family. “I’d Have You Anytime” is recognized as a statement of friendship between the two musicians, whose meetings from 1964 onward resulted in changes in musical direction for both Dylan and the Beatles. The song reflects the environment in which it was written, as Harrison’s verses urge the shy and elusive Dylan to let down his guard, and the Dylan-composed choruses respond with a message of welcome.

As a gentle ballad, “I’d Have You Anytime” went against pop-music convention of the time for an album opener. The recording was co-produced by Phil Spector in London and features a much-admired lead guitar part by Eric Clapton.

The lyrics reflect an approach regarding demonstrating love for his close friends that Harrison’s widow Olivia has described as “very unabashed, quite romantic in a sense“, as well as a view expressed by Tom Petty, a fellow Traveling Wilbury with Harrison and Dylan in 1988–90, that Harrison was able to [connect with] the notoriously elusive Dylan in a way that few others could. Author Ian Inglis views “I’d Have You Anytime” as working as a straightforward love song, with Harrison’s “Let me into your heart” serving as “not a desperate plea but a reassuring conversation“, and Dylan’s “All I have is yours / All you see is mine” providing the same “element of reciprocity that distinguished the declaration of love” in Harrison’s song “Something”.

Let me in here, I know I’ve been here
Let me into your heart
Let me know you, let me show you
Let me roll it to you

All I have is yours
All you see is mine
And I’m glad to hold you in my arms
I’d have you anytime

Let me say it, let me play it
Let me lay it on you
Let me know you, let me show you
Let me grow upon you

All I have is yours
All you see is mine
And I’m glad to hold you in my arms
I’d have you anytime

Let me in here, I know I’ve been here
Let me into your heart
Songwriters: Robert Dylan /Bob Dylan / George Harrison

After reading Jim’s post, I tried to think of another romantic song in the same vein. First I looked to Pearl Jam, then Bob Dylan, Planet Waves in particular, but none struck the kind of chord I was looking for. Then I was led to my ongoing musical hero, George Harrison, and thought of this song. I’m sure I read somewhere that it was written for one of the women George had an affair with, and that’s what I thought it was – until today. Imagine my surprise when I found out that George and Bob Dylan wrote this together and the circumstances around the writing. I was also shocked to see that the song is about two friends rather than a romantic relationship. As I look at the lyrics in light of the two brilliant songwriter-musicians, both sensitive and spiritual individuals who were each going through their own rough patches, the song made perfect sense to me.

When I think of love, too often I try to confine it to its little boxes, depending on its connection to narcissistic me; for example, romantic love, love for my children, love of nature, love of my furbaby, love for family, love for friends, love of ideas, etc. Why shouldn’t love be able to go where it will and how it will and not be confined by anything. Why shouldn’t a friendship go soul deep?

Let me in here, I know I’ve been here

George begins with what sounds like a suggestion of reincarnation, where the two have known and made a soul connection with each other in another lifetime. There are relationships that have deep resonance and this is one of them.

Let me know you, let me show you
Let me roll it to you

After establishing this past-life connection, there’s an expressed desire to re-weave the threads from before and begin again in the refreshed connection.

All I have is yours
All you see is mine
And I’m glad to hold you in my arms
I’d have you anytime

Dylan responds and acknowledges he also feels that prior connection. His soul is receptive and opens a welcoming space for George.

The rest of the song is reiteration of the same.

I’d be interested in hearing your thoughts on love, friendship, and the soul connection. “Let me know you.”

17 thoughts on “#MM Music Challenge — Soul Deep — George Harrison’s I’d Have you Anytime

  1. The way I feel about it is that John and Paul were bullies when they felt threatened and something about George threatened him so they kept him constricted. Watching videos and reading about the ways they did it is becoming quite painful. That video today that Jim posted with Paul playing piano and singing let it be while Ringo drummed, John strummed a guitar and George sat there with his guitar doing nothing really was the pits.

    Like

  2. But don’t forget though…George bit back many times. He didn’t just take a lot of it.
    I think until around 68 John and Paul were use to having it their way. George wasn’t helped out either by George Martin.
    Martin has admitted it…he said he felt bad about it.
    They looked at George like a younger brother…always. Age was a big thing in Liverpool…George said that I will always be younger than Paul no matter what I do…

    You know you bring up so good points…I guess I never thought as much about it because I see how the Stones and other groups operated. The Who were fair but the Stones…. Keith and Mick were down right ghastly…they were terrible.
    Bill Wyman, Brian Jones got zero publishing and their songs were not welcomed. Wyman got one song on one album in 30 years.
    The Beatles way of operating was if one vote was cast against..then it would not happen. That worked until John, George and Ringo picked Allen Klein ignoring Pauls vote no.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Brian Jones got zero publishing??? He lent so much to the character of the songs! Wyman 1 song 30 years? That is ghastly! So Klein was good in breaking up the stalemate but he also ripped them off. I appreciate your knowledge in the dynamics of the group.

    Like

  4. I shouldn’t compare…but when you look at them and then look at The Beatles…you see the love The Beatles had and the Stones did NOT. That is probably the reason the Stones are still together and The Beatles broke up.

    Now with Hey Jude …Paul and George got into it…on this I have to take Pauls side. George wanted to echo the lyrics on guitar..when Paul would sing…Hey Jude…George would copy that on his guitar dum dum…Don’t Make It Bad…dum dum dum dum…but Paul wisely said no… That is part of what the Let It Be argument came from.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.