dVerse — Sylvia & Ted — zebra mussels

 

Seafaring stowaways
Dumped by
Careless bilge pumps

Once foreign, home
Quiet freshwater invasion
Clams now refugees

Tiniest zebras
Roaming submerged plains
OCD to clean – and glue

Small, razor sharp
Shell seeds
White putty insides

Sifting creepers
Scour water
Green to clear

Herons-adored
A traveler’s banquet
Easy pickins

Reside underside
Driftwood hide
Washed-up skeletons

Waterline displacers
Shards for sand
Foe, not friend

Kim of Writing in North Norfolk is today’s host of dVerse.  Kim says:
The challenge is to write a poem in the format and style of either Plath or Hughes. It must be about something that grows or multiplies and is in some way invasive.

Please watch the slide show to learn more about these opportunistic invaders.

Slideshow came from here.

38 Comments Add yours

  1. I had to check, and we have it here as well it’s not one of those that are worst I think, but apparently it’s spreading.

    You made it seem almost good (at least to the herons)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      They did bring the great blue herons back, and they are plentiful now. I knew a lot about ZM, but after reading the slide presentation I see how menacing they are to the Great Lakes (and elsewhere)

      Like

  2. Beverly Crawford says:

    Great introduction of those insidious little zebra mussels that have negative impact on ecosystems! Well done..

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Beverly 🙂

      Like

  3. The short sharp stanzas give this an insistent strength, works well with the theme. All those invasive species are pretty creepy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Sarah. We have plant invaders here that are terrible also, which include phragmites (look like giant plumes) and purple loostrife.

      Like

  4. Carol Anne says:

    Awesome words! Great poem!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks Carol Anne!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Glenn A. Buttkus says:

    I don’t know much about zebra mussels. I do know that edible mussels are not as good as clams. Your Plath style poem rolls by, building for the last strong stanza.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Glenn. And these things are so small they are not edible by humans.

      Like

  6. kanzensakura says:

    I like mussels but not zebra ones. I used to cook them by the bushels at the restaurants. People would eat them and suck down beer.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      These are wee mussels, shell size as long as and half as wide as a fingernal. Never had mussels. Scallops now, YUM.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I am working on a method to electrocute all of the zebra mussels.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      If you can do it without electrocuting everything else in the water, more power to you! Do you have ZM in FL?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Zebra mussels have not reached Florida yet, but they are thriving nearby in Arkansas, Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and West Virginia.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          They travel around on the bottoms of boats, which makes it so easy to spread 😦

          Liked by 1 person

  8. Rob Kistner says:

    Sound like ruthless, relentless little bastards Lisa. Pox on them!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I loved how they cleaned up Lake MI and brought the great blue herons back, but the more I learn about them the more sinister they become…

      Like

  9. rivrvlogr says:

    I was diving in the Great lakes in the 80s, when the zebra Mussel infestation first hit. The water was clearer, and visibility vastly improved, but the damn things coated everything. By the time I was done diving in the late 90s, there were some shallow wrecks (down to 60 or 70 feet) that were unrecognizable. That was before the quagga were prevalent, so I imagine it’s much worse now on the deeper wrecks. I dived a few times on the wrecks in the Straits. I wonder how they have fared.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      That glue stuff where they go onto living creatures is terrifying.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. memadtwo says:

    The style works perfectly with the subject. Invasion is the right word, and often there seems to be no defense. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

  11. kim881 says:

    I’m so pleased you wrote about the zebra mussels, Jade! Not many people know about them. I love that you describe them as ‘Seafaring stowaways’ and ‘Tiniest zebras / Roaming submerged plains’, and that they:
    ‘Reside underside
    Driftwood hide
    Washed-up skeletons’.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks Kim. Hoping you’re feeling better today.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. kim881 says:

        Thank you, Jade. The vomiting virus seems to be sharing but the chest infection is will awful. I hope to see the doctor tomorrow or on Friday.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Sending you virtual chicken soup and peppermint-chamomile tea until then.

          Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m also glad you picked the zebras- such an insidious pest. The worst thing about lagging behind the pack is that people beat me to the bunch with their comments!
    ‘Reside underside
    Driftwood hide
    Washed-up skeletons”
    is also my stanza of choice. But I loved the whole thing and thought it extremely clever that you managed to work Sylvia’s “white” into your poem – also appreciated “shards for sand” and the way you managed to use hackneyed old friend/foe in a fresh viable way.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Christine thank you for your comments and helping me to appreciate what I’ve written more!

      Like

  13. pvcann says:

    I like the rhythm – it carries a sense of urgency about the foe.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Paul. It is an urgent matter, so I’m glad it does. Does Australia have them in their waters?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. pvcann says:

        They’re not known in the south western part but as for the rest I don’t know, now I’ll have to check 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. pvcann says:

        No, it doesn’t seem to be present, no sightings. But most of our fresh water has a natural high salt level.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Wouldn’t that make it salt water? I guess in this case it is a plus for you. I wonder if highly salinating our water to kill them then de-salinating it would help??

          Liked by 1 person

          1. pvcann says:

            The way things are going it will just happen 🙁

            Liked by 1 person

  14. the last line felt like a loud period. creatively done!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for reading and commenting 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Sabio Lantz says:

    Good tour of the complicated lives.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Sabio.

      Like

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