A2Z 2020 — essential oils — Q — quinquenervia, meleleuca (aka Niaouli)

Q letter

Melaleuca quinquenervia (broad-leaved paperbark) is the most damaging of 60 exotic species introduced to the Florida Everglades to help drain low-lying swampy areas. Introduced in the early 20th century, it has become a serious invasive species, with damaging effects including the displacement of native species, reduction in wildlife habitat, alteration of hydrology, modification of soil, and changes in fire regimes. The area of infestation has increased 50-fold over 25 years. – from wikipedia

Image result for Melaleuca quinquenervia culture
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Niaouli (aka true niaouli) (Melaleuca quinquenervia)

Appearance: 60 foot-high tree with peeling white bark; has fluffy white bottlebrush flowers

Parts used: leaves and twigs

It has long been used in indigenous medicine.  A wealth of information on it is here.

Oil appearance: colorless to pale yellow

Therapeutic uses: bronchitis, respiratory tract disorders, influenza, sinus congestion, sore throat, cough, colds, uterine infection, rheumatism, muscular injury, rashes, pimples, acne, herpes, wounds, cuts, grazes, insect repellent

Precautions: not to be used on babies or young children

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RECIPE

Muscle and Joint Pain Blend
–from Mom Prepares

  • 10 drops Niaouli EO

  • 8 drops Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens)EO

  • 5 drops Black pepper (Piper nigrum)EO

  • 5 drops Sweet Marjoram (Origanum majorana)(winter mountain)

Mix the oils well in a small dark glass bottle. To use, add five drops of the blend to a teaspoon of sweet almond or other carrier oil and rub on the affected muscle or joint.

31 Comments Add yours

  1. Tamara says:

    Melaleuca quinquenervia, or Niaouli for that matter, is another plant I have never heard about. Sounds like its benefits may help Corona patients breathe better?

    Happy Monday!

    My Q is for Switzerland as a diverse, quadrilingual country.
    https://thethreegerbers.blogspot.com/2020/04/a-z-2020-switzerland-quadrilingual.html

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m not specifically following this challenge but I am enjoying your posts when I see them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks and glad you are enjoying them. It was a learning experience putting them together.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Frédérique says:

    Niaouli! I knew it was a therapeutic plant, because friends named their sailboat Niaouli and we used to sail with them! Sweet memories…
    Q is for Quilting Longarm

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 I love the quilts you show today. I went to the lady’s site and see she has a degree in engineering. That might help explain some of it.

      Like

  4. Pradeep Nair says:

    Never knew about Niaouli. An informative post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Pradeep.

      Like

  5. soniadogra says:

    Niaouli…I had no idea about this Jade. Maybe because not very popular in this part of the world. I know a new thing today.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Happy to hear you learned about it today.

      Like

  6. Arti says:

    The name reminded me of Guinevere and King Arthur!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Ah yes it does look similar. I wonder now about the word origins!

      Like

  7. I have never heard of Niaouli before. It’s ironic that a plant that has been a pest can be so beneficial!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes it is, Shweta. I think it never should have been planted in the Everglades. Just like the nutria that somebody brought up from South America and let loose in Louisiana, which is now destroying the habitat there. I just watched a documentary called “Rodents of Unusual Size” where nutria are pretty much 40# rats! They eat the vegetation along the waterways, which then washes the soil into the river.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Exotic species tend to interfere a lot with the local fauna and it can lead to collapse of delicate ecosystems. It;s heartbreaking – the extent to which humans have deteriorated our planet. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

  8. While I had heard about this oil, I didn’t know the plant was invasive. It is amazing that we can get something good out of it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      It’s invasive in FL, but in its natural habitat it’s probably just fine.

      Like

  9. Fun post – I wondered what you were going to choose for Q. I sort of compare Niaouli and Tea Tree, and although some people find Niaouli a bit more “medicinal” smelling, I find it somehow “softer” than Tea Tree. But I’m especially fascinated by the trees, also known as Paperbark.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Good information to know, thank you.

      Like

  10. Kathe W. says:

    wow- are they trying to eradicate it? Sounds pretty serious. Have a happy and healthy day!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I’m not sure if they are or not, but they should be! It will cause a lot of destruction of habitat for indigenous flora and the fauna that depend on that flora.

      Like

  11. Frewin55 says:

    Where did these invasive species originate – they have gum trees – also swamp-loving, in Australia which are a paper-bark type of Eucalyptus but I don’t think it is these?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I think it is similar to eucalyptus. Principal places of production are Madagascar, Tasmania, Australia, and New Caledonia. They are in the same plant family of Myrtaceae.

      Like

  12. selizabryangmailcom says:

    I’m completely ignorant of all this information. So interesting.
    Can you imagine if your name was Quinquenervia? That would be super-unique. I love that word.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glad you find the info interesting. If I had that name, they’d call me Q. It is a neat name.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. selizabryangmailcom says:

        Yeah, Quin or maybe Ervia or Erv. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Anne Nydam says:

    Where is its native habitat?
    The whole invasive species thing is so frustrating: species that are beloved and beneficial where they belong become a nightmare in the wrong place. Right now I am being plagued by the English sparrows that constantly harass and bully my native songbirds that are nesting in my yard.
    Black and White (Words and Pictures)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Principal places of production are Madagascar, Tasmania, Australia, and New Caledonia. I hear you on invasive species. In the city English sparrows and European starlings take over feeding stations. We have issues with purple loosestrife and phragmites pushing native plant species out just because someone thought they looked pretty in their garden. Nobody should have been allowed to do mass plantings of this tree in FL. It’s sheer stupidity!

      Like

  14. Ronel Janse van Vuuren says:

    Pretty tree 🙂

    An A-Z of Faerie: Banshee

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Your A2Z series is quite educational. I’m learning about plants I’d never heard of and their beneficial properties. Doing things naturally is better than script or OTC if it works. Thanks for sharing and I’m sorry for the late return visit. I’ve fallen behind but I’ll catch up, my dear. Have a good day!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Cathy, and I agree 100% on natural ways.

      Liked by 1 person

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