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dVerse — Merfolk — Ondine

He found her floundering in his net,
which was empty until then.
Lost troubled face; confused and spent.

Docked at the empty cottage
where his mother lived before;
he gave her baggy clothes to wear.

Off to the village to see Annie,
he didn’t see her bury something
in the garden.

She sang, the fish jumped, and
fat coins plinked into his hungry
palm.

Annie recognized the selkie’s song
and knew that she would leave
before long.

The silken coat revealed
when strangers came to claim the prize
Will love prevail with gentle eyes?

 

“Ondine” is an Irish-made film that tells the tale of a woman a fisherman finds in his net. His little daughter is convinced that the woman is a selkie. I won’t give away any spoilers, but the movie is well worth a watch.

 

 

De Jackson (aka WhimsyGizmo) is today’s host of dVerse.  De says:
Mermaids. Sirens. Selkies. Women of the sea. Or write about a Merman, if you please. Just woo us with your mer-words, or the promise of a tempting sea shanty, or something shiny.

39 thoughts on “dVerse — Merfolk — Ondine

  1. I love the little mysteries in this – it’s so matter of fact in one way – the baggy clothes, the village – and yet we don’t quite know who this woman is, or what she buries, or even who Annie is. It’s like being told a true story that hasn’t quite settled down yet.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I have to watch that film, Lisa! I enjoyed your interpretation of the story very much, the shape of it, the three-line stanzas, and the line, ’He found her floundering in his net’, the perfect introduction to the story. I also like the hint at her identity in the ‘something’ she buried in the garden.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. It probably would. I haven’t been anywhere, not had a holiday since 1990. Once we started having kids we didn’t have the means. My eldest daughter has been back with her partner and the others would too if it were possible. One day, I hope.

        Liked by 1 person

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