#FF — Due Process


PHOTO PROMPT © Marie Gail Stratford

It’s Friday. We twelve have been here all week. Julie proposed yesterday that we each say a prayer for guidance in the challenge before us.

The room is rather shabby but after last night’s storm, the light is good. The chairs are comfortable. The refrigerator is stocked with bottled water. The large speaker was initially distracting with court pages, but Lenny found out how to turn it off.

At 10a the vote is ten to three to convict. By noon, it’s six and six. By four, it’s unanimous to acquit.

We buzz the bailiff. She leads us into the courtroom.

[100 words]

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields is the inviting host of Friday Fictioneers.

51 Comments Add yours

  1. Intriguing!

    Love the yin and yang flow of it all!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Louise 🙂

      Like

  2. neilmacdon says:

    I was going to suggest it would be better to stock the fridge with something other than water until I realised it was a jury room. Suggestion withdrawn

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Sadje says:

    Very interesting story Li.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Sadje. I watched a movie last night, “12 Angry Men” about a jury and the prompt photo reminded me of the room they were in.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        I think I’ve seen it too.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Fandango says:

    That’s quite a turnaround. Can you share the name of the guy’s lawyer? Or maybe the head juror?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      LOL Fandango. Have you seen “12 Angry Men.” Aside from the orange stain’s former cabinet that is 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Fandango says:

        Yes, I loved “12 Angry Men.” A real classic. Very intense.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Nobbinmaug says:

    Shades of “12 Angry Men,” which I see you referenced in the comment right above me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes, Nobbin. I switched up some of the ingredients but the flavor is still there. Thank you for noticing.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. badfinger20 (Max) says:

    Great influence Lisa! I am glad they came to terms…no hung jury.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Iain Kelly says:

    12 Angry Men is a classic film. I liked how you used the prompt for this one.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I guess the jury gets worn out in the end. I was asked to be on a jury once, and thankfully they cancelled. It wouldn’t have pleasant discussing the crime for so long.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Li, I really love how you used 12 Angry Men as a springboard for this intriguing story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Punam!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. memadtwo says:

    Juries are an interesting experience. Even the selection process. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I agree, Kerfe. I don’t see them as fair and impartial because of the selection process. I also don’t like all of the ways people can be excused from jury duty. It should be truly random, but initially based on demographics also, and it should be mandatory.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. memadtwo says:

        I think there are legitimate excuses–I had to serve when my youngest was 3 and I had only morning preschool for her–don’t ask, a nightmare. But too many people do abuse doing their duty. And it is a duty. My mother was never once called up, while my father served many times.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          I’ve had to serve once and have gotten the letter a few times but never had to go again. Not sure about my folks or my kids but I think at least one son had gotten a letter but didn’t have to go.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. memadtwo says:

            I’ve been called up too many times to count. Most times it’s civil cases and they get settled during or after jury selection. The one criminal jury I served on was an excellent experience.

            Liked by 1 person

  11. Dear Lisa,

    I hope the defendant is worthy of acquittal. There are enough criminals on the loose as it is. A good build of tension. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rochelle, thank you. The movie, “12 Angry Men,” is what I based it on. Part of the shock value for me with it was how the perspectives, based on the evidence after minutely discussed by all, shifted. Thank you for reading and your comment.
      Shalom,
      Lisa

      Like

  12. I’m sure some jury members go with the majority just so they can go home. In many cases, it’s the most persuasive lawyer that wins them over, rightly or wrongly.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      The movie, “12 Angry Men,” covers those aspects very well. Most are sheep, which is bad, but even sheep sometimes can be convinced to listen to the truth. There has to be a leader who has integrity and strength though to speak up.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Now I wonder what was in the water …

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Dora says:

    That was quite a turnaround! Hopefully, justice prevailed.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Dora. In the film, they didn’t decide if he was guilty or innocent, only that there was reasonable doubt. The burden of proof is on the prosecution to prove beyond reasonable doubt.

      Like

      1. Dora says:

        You know, I need to rewatch that Lumet movie. I have too dim a recollection of it.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. plaridel says:

    i could relate. been there and done that. i’d been to a jury that lasted a month before we were able to come up with a decision.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Plaridel, I’m so glad your jury took its time to make sure justice was done. That’s quite a commitment of time.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Danny James says:

    Hope you all made the right decision.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. James McEwan says:

    I wonder if this real justice or else they were just worn down to get the job finished so they could go home. It makes me wonder what really goes on.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      James I’m sure it runs the gamut. In the movie, it started out with 11 wanting to convict within minutes but 1 had reasonable doubt.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Sandra says:

    Imagine someone’s fate taking a turn like that during the course of a day. Good one.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for the closer look, Sandra.

      Like

  19. granonine says:

    And of course, no one was more relieved for that long day to be over than the possibly very guilty accused person.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. draliman says:

    They got there in the end, for right or wrong. I hope I never have to take part in a long trial, no matter how much bottled water is supplied!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. The jury is out on this. Mission accomplished. A neat job, what say! Time to unscrew that bottle, please! Loved the yin yang flow here.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Many thanks for your wonderful comment. Cheers!

      Like

  22. notestowomen says:

    I enjoyed reading this, Lisa. And 12 Angry Men is a great source of inspiration.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Magarisa, yes it is!

      Like

  23. Laurie Bell says:

    Aha, jury room. Great concept. And I love the up and down flow of the verdict. I wonder what the case was? I love the way you focus on the little things, the water, how long they’ve been there, the distracting noise from the speaker. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Laurie! It’s based on a movie where it starts with them headed to the jury room, so we don’t get to hear any of the trial.

      Like

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