dVerse — Quadrille 129 — Dragon Lover

on

dragon shadow soap dish

What is this curiosity we have
for winged, scaled worms
called dragons?

Proof that subterranean vole-bait
may transform to soar at-will?

Is it their new capriciousness to
choose “scorched earth” that attracts?

They still sleep in dark wet, for godsakes!

Then I spied one…

It’s not easily seen in the picture, but the shadow of the soap dish on the wall looks like a dragon.  Also, in Chinese mythology, fish (called Kun) are said to burst from the water and morph into dragons, which makes this doubly cool as the soap dish is in a fish (and shell) shape.

De Jackson (aka WhimsyGizmo) is today’s host of dVerse’ Quadrille. De says:

Just compose us a poem of exactly 44 words, not counting the title, and including some form of the word CURIOSITY (curious, curiousness, curiouser, etc).

54 Comments Add yours

  1. Dragons are fascinating… and the more I read the more I get convinced that you will find them if you seek them…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Bjorn I love that thought.

      Like

    2. msjadeli says:

      p.s. Has The Aged Librarian ever written about dragons? If he hasn’t, I wish he would.

      Like

  2. De Jackson says:

    So cool! When hubby and I use our fire pit, i am always looking for dragons. Love them, and love this poem!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Now that is really neat, De. I never seek them out. This one seemed to find me. It probably helps that I had just read a book with a dragon in it 🙂 Thank you and glad you enjoyed it.

      Like

  3. Grace says:

    Aren’t we all interested in dragons? That is an interesting & cool shape of the soap dish. You got the eye, smiles.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Grace I love your comment. I guess I do 🙂

      Like

  4. Ingrid says:

    This is just fantastic: both the photo and your words! In some of Slovenia’s karst caves there are ‘proteus’ aka ‘human fish’ – a type of pinked-skinned salamander. I think they would make very attractive dragons!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I’m sure they do, Ingrid! Oh to see a baby dragon in the karst caves!!!!!! Thank you, Ingrid.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. kim881 says:

    Dragons are amazing and they seem to pop up everywhere! The Welsh have the most intriguing mythology about dragons, which are supposed to be sleeping in the Welsh mountains. Chinese dragons are wonderful too. I admit, I am curious about dragons. There’s a fabulous poem by Brian Patten that I used to explore with younger children when I was teaching. It’s called ‘A Small Dragon’. Here’s a link: https://childrens.poetryarchive.org/poem/a-small-dragon/

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes they are a source of endless amazement and curiosity aren’t they. Maybe the thought of dragons sleeping in the mountains is what has me wanting to go to the mountains? I just heard the reading of ‘A Small Dragon’ and am struck by how wonderful it is and how well the man read it. I can see the looks on the childrens faces as you read it to them. Thanks for the link ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  6. ghostmmnc says:

    Love the ending! The photo is amazing how the actual fish dish transforms into the dragon shaped shadow! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I’m glad you are as amazed as I am by it. Thanks much, Barbara 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Glenn A. Buttkus says:

    Your “concept” of the soap dish/dragon connection is pure minimalism; love it. My favorite dragons can all talk, with better diction than Yoda.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glenn thank you for your feedback on it. I would love to hear the stories of your encounters with dragons. Have you written any on them?

      Like

  8. I like dragons. Handy to light a fire when matches are wet. Good on keeping a safe perimeter from icky peeps. Decent back-scratch against the scales. Fly you out of tight spots. (and, it seems, wash dishes).

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Oh how I love your comments. It’s clear you are well acquainted with dragons 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 😀 Me know dragons. Yes. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          She says as her tail curls in delight 😉

          Liked by 1 person

  9. shadows are fun 🙂
    (and also random shapes on floor tiles, for that matter)
    anyway, you had me at “dragon”, Lisa!


    David

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks for your comment, David. At my old house, the paneling had a menagerie of critters in it.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Ron. says:

    I thought I’d spotted a dragon the other day out on the treeline, but it vanished before I could focus it in. Now that I’ve met your soap dish and read your outstanding poem, I’m sure I’ll be seeing it again soon & repeatedly. Thanks, Lisa.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. rothpoetry says:

    The Chinese have been curious about dragons for thousands of years it seems. Your poem morphing a soap dish into a dragon is most interesting. Perhaps that bar of soap is really the dragon sleeping in the soggy deep! :>)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 you just never know…

      Liked by 1 person

  12. This was wonderful Lisa. Sometimes I stare at lizards and geckos imagining them to become enormous and blow fire 😳😦

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 If you see them smoking, run!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Beverly Crawford says:

    I always fantasized meeting with the Pen Draig, leader of them all!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Very cool, Beverly. I hope one day you do.

      Like

  14. Dragons spark our imagination and your soap dish is absolutely enchanting with its magical shadow! 😍

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you much, Tricia and happy you find it enchanting 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Maggie C says:

    Inspiration in a soap dish. Lovely.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Thank you, Maggie.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. kaykuala h says:

    Love your assertion of a transformation that may come with a surprise. The suspense of discovery whets the curiosity, Jade!

    Hank

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Hank, thank you for your lovely comment and happy you connected with it.

      Like

  17. Shawna says:

    “Proof that subterranean vole-bait
    may transform to soar at-will?
    Is it their new capriciousness to
    choose ‘scorched earth’ that attracts?”

    This is very cool.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Shawna, thank you 🙂

      Like

  18. It does look like a dragon indeed. That’s interesting. Very good observation skills, Li

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks much, Shweta 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I love your eye, and how you’ve managed to create such a bold work from a dainty shadow.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Darius, thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. K.Hartless says:

    Fire dragons, Ice dragons, scaly tales and webby wings. Curiosity and awe-a good mix.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. memadtwo says:

    Shadows take on their own life. Who’s to say they are not dragons? (K)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I like the way you think. Exactly.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. pvcann says:

    The curiosity of the poet becomes the readers curiosity, beautifully done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      ❤ Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. pvcann says:

        Very welcome Lisa

        Liked by 1 person

  23. you ask and it shall reveal itself to you! this is curiously lovely, Ms. Lisa!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you very much, Rosemarie, glad you enjoyed the poem 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Helen Dehner says:

    Wow Lisa …. this has to be the most creative, phantasmagorical quadrilles ever.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 glad you liked it, Helen, thanks!

      Like

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