dVerse Poetics — Memories of Dad

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After my folks divorced, my mom and us kids moved away. The new house was smaller, but brighter. The old, quiet, mostly childless neighborhood switched to one full of children for my brothers and I to play with.

running in sunlight
I shoot and make the basket
my new best friend cheers

Weekends with my dad were always fun. We went boating on an inland lake, walked along a railroad trestle bridge in the marsh, and enjoyed impromptu rope swings in parks. He made us stilts that we stepped off on from the tall concrete back step. He bought us vehicles – bikes, go-carts, mini-bikes, and later, cars – as birthday gifts. We went on family bike rides, but only at night, to playgrounds and through cemeteries.

Streetlight’s small moons watch
us run-jump merry-go-round
Dad’s cigarette glows

On Saturday nights we would bake a store-bought frozen peach pie and put a big scoop of vanilla ice cream on each warm wedge. We would eat them as we watched shows on black-and-white television. Dad would name the actors as we watched.

So far from the tree
a peach bodhisattva sings
duets with Hepburn

top image link

Michelle Beauchamp aka Mish is today’s host of dVerse’ Poetics. Mish says:
Fruit has found its way into poetry. For today’s prompt, I’d like it to find its way into yours. You have options for this prompt.

Write a poem based on a memory that a fruit evokes. Kim did a lovely prompt, entitled “How to Cut a Pomegranate” back in June. You can revisit the idea of exploring a fruit, appealing to the senses. Share the connection or memory that a fruit evokes for you. OR

Write about an emotion or abstract concept. What does it taste like? Consider the quote above by Rodman Philbrick, from The Last Book in the Universe and how he imagines the taste of clouds. What does freedom taste like? What does guilt, grief or peace taste like? Does it remind you of the taste of a fruit? You do not have to stay in the confines of fruit. OR

Think outside of the fruit bowl! Create your OWN fruit. Yes, imagine the look, feel, and taste. Where did it come from? How does it grow? Is it magical? Take us to the a fantasy land of fruit.

58 Comments Add yours

  1. the intersperal of haiku with your prose recollections touched with nostalgia is wonderful to read and imagine. That last haiku is superb!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Laura, thank you. Frank Tassone often uses that format with haibun. I’m pleased you enjoyed reading them.

      Like

      1. yes its a style I eschew, never quite knowing how to grasp it

        Liked by 1 person

  2. josaiawrites says:

    I’m not a poet, but did have a thought about a particular fruit that I’ve consumed more each year…..
    The fruit of grief….. Which must be consumed whenever and wherever it arrives…. With its bitter taste, it goes down hard and burns all the way through…..
    Yet once digested, this fruit from the tree of grief….. can give the sweetest and most tender appreciation for each precious moment of life ….

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Josaia, are you sure you aren’t a poet 😉 Such a beautiful and wise comment. Thank you for sharing it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. josaiawrites says:

        Thank you so much! ♥️

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          You’re very welcome. If you ever want to write “non-poetry” again, please come and visit the poets at dVerse.

          Like

          1. josaiawrites says:

            Will do!! (Feel free to check out my blog as well if you like!…..josaia.com).

            Liked by 1 person

            1. msjadeli says:

              Just did and commented.

              Like

    2. Mish says:

      I think you may be a poet. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I love how you layered the prose with haiku… they create just the right contrast.. also I love the difference between your life with your mother and your father…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Bjorn, thank you for your thoughtful and observant comment. You’re right, the differences between the two lives were extreme.

      Like

  4. Irene says:

    I could almost hear children laughing in the background. Beautiful memories, skilfully gathered together with poetry and prose!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Irene, thank you very much. It was so long ago and yet seems like just yesterday ❤

      Like

  5. Mish says:

    This format worked wonderfully, each haiku adding more depth to your stories. There is so much joy and love that shines through your words. Pieces of pie….and pieces of your heart. A special dad. 🙂

    Like

  6. Dora says:

    Lisa,
    “Dad’s cigarette glows”: that really got to me in this beautifully penned remembrance of your father. He sounds wonderfully loving.
    pax,
    dora

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Dora, thank you very much and glad you connected with the poem.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dora says:

        You’re welcome, Lisa.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. sanaarizvi says:

    Oh my heart this is poignant! Especially moved by the image; “a store-bought frozen peach pie and put a big scoop of vanilla ice cream on each warm wedge.” Thank you for sharing.. 💝

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Sanaa, thank you very much and glad you enjoyed the poem.

      Like

  8. Beverly Crawford says:

    You were fortunate that, even though divorced, your father appears to be a very constant and loving influence in your life. That is often not the case. Great write.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Beverly my dad was like clockwork in his ways and yes, so much of his influence was positive, I’m fortunate. I agree many are not so fortunate. Thank you for reading.

      Like

  9. Anonymous says:

    Did your parents remarry others? Stepparents muddy the waters. Your customized haibun really hits the spot, much like your peach pie ala mode.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      “Someone” (who is this?), Mom remarried and stayed with Stepdad until he passed on. Dad never remarried. Stepdad and I did *not* get along at all at the time, but honestly speaking he was twice the parent my mom was. Thank you for reading, your question, and your comment.

      Like

  10. robtkistner says:

    Such wonderful memories Lisa, and there was love, and a bit of tender longing. Excellent piece!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Rob. I’m glad you caught that longing. So many things I never had a chance to tell my dad.

      Like

  11. Helen Dehner says:

    I so enjoyed this glimpse into your past ~~ your poem is beautifully composed!!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. memadtwo says:

    Sweet sorrows..the weight of them grows with each year. Beautifully rendered. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Kerfe, thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Isn’t it something how seeing a food item, or even just thinking about it, can bring back memories? I section a tomato for a salad, and nothing. But slice it to top a burger with lettuce, and I see my dad, fifty years ago, eating a sandwich with nothing more than tomato slices and Miracle Whip.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes it is. I think it has something to do with the multi-sensory experience of food that lodges it within us. If the prompt would have been butter pecan ice cream it would have brought back other memories of my dad also.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Love this very much, Jade! Such a rich and full account of a well -managed childhood. Your Dad must have given great thoughts to the family’s happiness. Thanks for sharing Ma’am!

    Hank

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      ❤ Yes he did, Hank. I can see that now.

      Like

  15. Suzanne says:

    I really enjoyed your haibun. The memories are as delicious as a bowl of fruit.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Suzanne, thank you 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Sadje says:

    Lovely childhood memories Li.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Sadje, thank you ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        You’re welcome Li

        Liked by 1 person

  17. M Jay Dixit says:

    Nostalgic and touching! You let us have a glance into your life as you composed this beautiful haibun. Amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Jay, thank you and I appreciate your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Vandana Sharma says:

    Memories with parents should always be cherished, after all we are the fruit of their love!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for your thoughtful comment, Vandana.

      Like

  19. Wonderful telling of your childhood, and love the haiku.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Linda thank you very much.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. rothpoetry says:

    This is so very well written. Full of life and passion as well as sadness. The pie and ice Creams sounds wonderful!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks much, Dwight. It was ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  21. That reads, dare I say, like a very positive divorce… How far apart did you parents live, Lisa?


    David

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Maybe 3 miles at the most apart, but a very different part of town. Thanks for reading, David.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. badfinger20 (Max) says:

    I had fun visiting my dad also. Smells and foods can remind me of that time…that was lovely Lisa.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Max. What is one food you and your dad used to eat together?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. badfinger20 (Max) says:

        His favorite steak was a T-Bone…we would go to a restaurant where he knew the owner and he would order us one each…and he would cook them for us…he would broil them with onions.
        Whenever I hear T-Bone I think of him.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          YUM! What a special memory to have with your dad.

          Liked by 1 person

  23. so well written and sweet memories of you Dad!💖💖

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      My dad was a good guy and did the best he could for us kids. He taught us valuable lessons that have stood the test of time.

      Like

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