#FF — Once Mrs. Cleaver


PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.

Mom was a Mrs. Cleaver parent until I was five, making time to show me I was loved. But mom’s priorities changed to going out and sleeping in late. By my teens, we were mutually antagonistic strangers. When she drank and I mouthed off, she ripped my hair out, slapped me, and knocked me down. I hated her and left home at seventeen.

Mom’s alcoholic and violent behavior continued, and I maintained my distance. But isn’t everyone supposed to love their mother? Now we meet once a month at Rosie’s Diner for lunch. She’s sober, and I pretend I care.

[100 words]

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields is the validating host of Friday Fictioneers.

63 Comments Add yours

  1. granonine says:

    Kind of hard to “like” this one, but what I like is the excellent writing. Such a lot of (sad) story wrapped up in so few words!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Linda, thank you very much. I appreciate your kind words.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Sadje says:

    Very touching story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Sadje, thank you ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        You’re welcome

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Ain Starlingsson says:

    Well this is very sad…and feels too true for comfort…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Drug addiction and mental illness have destroyed many lives, and it is very sad 😦

      Like

  4. neilmacdon says:

    Perhaps from that tentative start they can find some point of further contact with each other. Probably not, but you never know

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You never know…

      Like

  5. Jen Goldie says:

    Well done Lisa! and and an excellent write!.❤
    I totally identify except mine didn’t drink and I don’t know if she’s even alive. No sympathy please.🙂 I’m over it. 😉💜

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Jen, thank you very much. I love your comment ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Dale says:

    That is heartbraeking and I imagine getting her to care will take e Herculean effort (if possible) and I can’t say I blame her. Still… that once-per-month meeting is something.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I echo your sentiments, Dale. Thank you for reading. It shows both are willing to pretend. Maybe one day things will change.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dale says:

        I’m rooting for them! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Iain Kelly says:

    A cruel disease, and such a shame she can’t forgive, but it is hard to understand as a child in that situation.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      If it ended, maybe she could?

      Liked by 1 person

  8. badfinger20 (Max) says:

    I’ve seen this before…not me thank goodness but I’ve seen it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      😦 It isn’t pretty.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. elmowrites says:

    I’m not acquainted with Mrs Cleaver, but the context gave me everything I needed. Sad story for both the protagonist and the mother. I can feel their ‘reconciliation’ too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for reading and your thoughtful comment.

      Like

  10. memadtwo says:

    A sad but predictable ending. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Powerfully ringing true for the realities of all too many, including the accommodations made to survival of the heart, after years of actual survival of the insanity one had little control over. Hugs, Na’ama

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Hugs back, Na’ama ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Nicely written but truly sad story. I guess some wounds are just too big to ever heal!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Christian. The wounds won’t heal when they keep getting ripped open 😦

      Liked by 2 people

  13. Sandra says:

    I once heard a counsellor say ‘it’s not compulsory to love your mother’. What a lot that gave me to think about. Loved your story, in particular that ending.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Sandra, I like the cultural edict that one must love their mother to the one that says one must love their God. It feels like a sin not to, no matter how undeserving that “icon” may be. I’m glad a counsellor had the courage to say it isn’t so. Thank you very much for your thoughtful comment.

      Like

  14. GHLearner says:

    So sad and too true for many. Great writing, Lisa, thought-provoking too. Maybe they can find common ground again, if the mother can get off the booze. I wonder why she began to drink in the first place.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Gah, thank you very much for your thoughtful comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. James McEwan says:

    Family can be the worst, it makes it difficult to break the emotional ties.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      James you are so right. Thank you for reading and your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Dear Lisa,

    I wonder if trying to be Mrs. Cleaver didn’t send mom over the edge. Pretty tough standard that even Barbara Billingsly didn’t relate to. 😉 That last line is a sock to the gut. Well done. Very well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rochelle, you very well may be right. She just wasn’t cut out to be a wife or a mother. Yet onward she stumbled having a whole passel of kids and another husband. Thank you very much for your thoughtful and kind comment.
      Shalom,
      Lisa

      Like

      1. You’re quite welcome, Lisa. 😄

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Bill says:

    Wow! Sad, sad story Lisa. If I may quote Bukowski again, “No one ever forgives a drunk.” (or something like that).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Bill that’s a new Buk quote for me. Great and incisively accurate. Yet at the same time, I don’t think the drunk gives a sh*t if they are forgiven or not — which gets to the crux of the matter. Thank you very much for your wonderful comment 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Bill says:

        Step 8: “Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.” Yes, for some, I agree, but forgiveness is not up to them. It’s up to us. Maybe it is how we define forgiveness. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Bill, I am well-acquainted with the process of forgiveness and how it takes the burden off of the shoulders of the victim/wronged and places it on the shoulders of the perpetrator/wrongdoer to do with what they will. It doesn’t mean the victim/wronged continues to subject themselves to current abuse because of a rationalization that “that’s just the way they are and I forgive them.” I like you getting into the nitty gritty of this because it’s important that we as human beings talk about it.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Bill says:

            Indeed. I agree with you. Sometimes, reconciliation is not possible. And we are certainly not going back for more of the same.

            Liked by 1 person

  18. trishsplace says:

    With such a ring of truth. Sad, relatable. Sad. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you very much, Trish.

      Like

  19. plaridel says:

    at least, they see each other. that’s a good start. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  20. draliman says:

    A sad story, but maybe with some hope of a reconciliation somewhere down the line.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Sounds about right, Ali. You never know…

      Liked by 1 person

  21. At least she’s doing the recent thing and making an effort. Perhaps they’ll have a proper chat about the past in time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Maybe, Keith. Never say never.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Too much damage done I think. It’s very sad for both., but maybe time will heal. Well written, Lisa.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks much, Brenda.

      Like

  23. oneday@atime says:

    This reminds me a lot of “a child called it” if you haven’t read it you should, though it might be triggering

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I have read it, and yes definite similarities. Thanks for reading and the suggestion.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. pennygadd51 says:

    Well and powerfully written. That last line is a killer.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Penny, thank you very much.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Dora says:

    She should have been sober when it mattered. Great storytelling, Lisa.
    pax,
    dora

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You’re so right, Dora. Thanks for reading and your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. ahtdoucette says:

    A powerful story that hits like an emotional gut punch at the end. I think we all have people like this in our lives. I *love* you but I *love* for you to stay over there emotionally. Totally feeling that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Well-said about the feeling, Anne. I’m both glad and sad you can relate to it. Thank you.

      Like

  27. So well written it comes across as true, een if it’s not it could be.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Michael, thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. You outdid yourself with this one, MS. Excelleint writing! Sad but true. .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Neel, thank you very much and glad you like it. It is a sad situation 😦

      Like

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