Music and (Gasp!) Records — Trent’s World (the Blog)

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A very thoughtful and insightful look at the state of music production, distribution, and appreciations that starts with a historical perspective and moves “up” to the future.

I want to talk about records.  I don’t mean those emails that need to be saved because they are “important records”, nor those receipts you keep in an old shoebox for your taxes.  I’m talking about those funny vinyl disks you might run into in an antique store.  You know, you place them on a […]

Music and (Gasp!) Records — Trent’s World (the Blog)

11 Comments Add yours

  1. trentpmcd says:

    Thanks for the reblog 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      My pleasure 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. memadtwo says:

    I just also commented to Trent that not only did we listen to music together we played music together. Everyone had a band or at least a guitar and some friends to sing with. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes! My first serious (I laugh when I think of him as being a serious boyfriend now) boyfriend had a guitar. The love was not meant to last, but he turned me on to a bunch of great music.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. memadtwo says:

        My boyfriend in high school had a band, but I also played guitars and sang with my best friend. We spent many hours working at it.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Oh wow, Kerfe, that is very cool. I played at the guitar and enjoyed it, but to practice it with others and perform takes it to the next level. Do you ever play your guitar now?

          Liked by 1 person

          1. memadtwo says:

            My younger daughter has it. She has the piano inherited from my parents too. Not sure how much she plays at this point, but certainly more than I did.

            Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks for flagging, Lisa, great post. I just left the following comment there, which is currently awaiting moderation:

    Nice and thoughtful post, which I saw thanks to Lisa from “Tao Talk.” I agree looking at a collection of vinyl records is an entirely different experience than looking at a CD collection or browsing a digital music library.

    I discovered my love for music as a 7 or 8-year-old thanks to the vinyl collection of my six-year-older sister. She introduced me to gems like Carole King’s “Tapestry”, CSNY’s “Deja Vu” and Pink Floyd’s “Wish You Were Here.” She also had greatest hits samplers by Santana, Simon & Garfunkel and America – all music I dig to this day.

    I also very well remember when CDs came out in the early ’80s – and how expensive they were initially. And how excitement there was about the sound quality of Dire Straits’ “Brothers in Arms”, one of the first CDs in DDD all-digital format. Like many music listeners, eventually, I made the transition to CDs. I was also taping music on music cassette like a madman from vinyl, CD and FM radio.

    Eventually, I discovered iTunes. At first, I bought select songs. At some point, I started streaming. As regrettable as it is how little music artists make from streams, one thing I will say is that my streaming music providers’ algorithms have become much better at predicting what I like. I used to make fun of them. Nowadays, thanks to their listening suggestions, I find myself discovering a good deal of new music and being reminded of songs/artists I had forgotten about.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Great comment, Christian, and I’m glad Trent’s post “struck a chord” with you 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Badfinger (Max) says:

    Great share Lisa! I commented that I had to make sure I didn’t write it lol. The idea of an album as a whole is a lost art…

    I think music meant more to us when we were young than now to younger people because they have so many choices.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Max. I was hoping you’d see it. I am 100% in agreement with what you say here.

      Like

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