#FF — Gentrified

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PHOTO PROMPT © Lisa Fox

My lineage has lived in this building since the town formed. Great-great grandfather helped Mr. Lanscombe lay the bricks, in exchange for a promise of a forever apartment for his family. Although deed-free, who could leave such an arrangement. A sesquicentennial later, I’m still here. Some say it’s a dump, but I make do.

Yesterday, I found a notice-to-vacate stapled to my door. The fine print explains how Lanscombe’s heir has jumped on the gentrification bandwagon.

I push my shopping cart around town these days. In winter, I hole up at the mission. The old place is looking pretty sharp.

[100 words]

Thank you, Rochelle, for using one of my photos for this week’s storytelling prompt!

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields is the dependable host of Friday Fictioneers.

64 Comments Add yours

  1. neilmacdon says:

    So much for promises!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      😦 Used to be a handshake was all that was needed.

      Like

  2. Dale says:

    That’s the trouble with the new generation… they don’t honor the old agreements!
    Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Dale, 100% in agreement with you. It seems like the digital age has thrown something important away… Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dale says:

        Sandly. And you’re welcome 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Dale says:

        Oh. And something weird is going on with WP. I just realised I am getting nothing from you 😒 Gotta go check what they did to our friendship!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          WP S-U-X sometimes 😦 Glad you noticed that ❤

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Dale says:

            I went to the settings and it was as it should be… and yet. So I clicked and reclicked and we shall see what’s what! 💞

            Liked by 1 person

  3. Sadje says:

    Sad story Li. People should honor the promises made by their forefathers

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes it is sad. This poor person has been left homeless, just like so many have been through “gentrification” 😦 Thank you for reading.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        My pleasure

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Iain Kelly says:

    That’s progress. Gentrification does tend to stomp all over the old traditions and ways.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      progress is a dirty word to me. white flight from urban life into suburbia to segregate from those of poverty and non-white skin — until they decided to move back to the city centers and into those cool old buildings. who cares what happens to the long-term residents 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  5. How sad, good take on the prompt

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks much, Shrawl.

      Like

  6. Dear Lisa,

    I guess forever only lasted a generation. Sad take on the prompt. Well done. And thank you for the prompt itself. 😉

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rochelle, thank you and you’re welcome 🙂
      Shalom,
      Lisa

      Like

  7. Badfinger (Max) says:

    I’m ashamed but I had to look that up!
    Sue Sue Sue…and I don’t mean a lady.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. A sad but probably pretty common story!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I think so. It sure is happening in this region.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. memadtwo says:

    Affordable housing is a huge problem. Too many in this situation. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      YES. Housing is unaffordable for many/most single people around here. When my older son’s gf moved out I thought for sure he was going to have to give up his apartment 😦 He lives like a monk these days as no disposable income — it all goes to rent and gas for his car.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. memadtwo says:

        Many of my friends’ children are either living at home or being subsidized by their parents. My girls did move home for awhile, but they’ve been both lucky enough to have and keep decent-paying jobs and willing to live in non-desirable locations until they could afford more. Also, neither one of them needs or owns a car–that is a huge expense. I actually don’t know how anyone can afford a car right now. And if you have a family…

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          I hear you, Kerfe. With son and driving, he lives in another city and has to stay in that county in order to qualify for the grant/state program that is paying for his undergraduate degree. It puts him in a difficult spot, but eventually he’ll have better options. Are you starting to get out and about on public transport? Is it safe yet?

          Liked by 1 person

          1. memadtwo says:

            I’ve taken the subway a few times. Most people are maskless now though, even though it’s still supposedly required on public transportation. People I know keep getting covid, some worse than others. And there are still random stabbings and shootings on the subway. But you have to take a few chances. I still keep a mask on when I’m inside public spaces, and try to travel when it’s not too crowded.

            Liked by 1 person

  10. rothpoetry says:

    A wonderful take on the prompt and a great story!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Dwight, thanks much. Glad you enjoyed the story. Have you ever thought about writing for Friday Fictioneers? I think you’d be great at it and enjoy doing it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. rothpoetry says:

        I have only pursued d’Verse as a writing venue. I like the challenge of a prompt, but get bogged down in writing for the sake of writing. I don’t know if that makes sense or not. I love the freedom of spontaneity. I get bogged down in poetic form writing for the same reason. But thank you for inviting me. I may check it out!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Dwight, I understand. I’ve backed off on a lot of prompt writing but much of that is due to a matter of time constraints at the moment. No pressure at all, just mentioned it. The writing group of writers at Friday Fictioneers are phenomenal, and Rochelle, our fearless leader, is the best.

          Like

          1. rothpoetry says:

            Thank you! :>)

            Liked by 1 person

            1. msjadeli says:

              You’re welcome.

              Like

          2. rothpoetry says:

            I guess the other thing is that I like to reciprocate reading and d’Verse keeps me constantly reading!

            Liked by 1 person

            1. msjadeli says:

              There are usually between 35-50 stories (each story is only 100 words) but that is over a whole week’s time that you can read them. I usually read 5-10 stories a day, which doesn’t take a lot of time.

              Liked by 1 person

  11. A very sad but all too common phenomenon nowadays. Lovely story and lovely photo too Lisa.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Neel, it truly is, and my heart goes out to the displaced residents that often end up in the shelters. Thank you very much on both counts.

      Like

  12. Bill says:

    Very true of humans. Let the “get it in writing” and check with a good lawyer lesson stick. And even then, nothing is certain, even less is forever. Always look both ways crossing one way streets. Good one, Lisa.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      It’s a sad world that operates on this philosophy imo. Thanks, Bill.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Bill says:

        Reality. Everybody hates it. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          A quote from U2: “Some days are better than others.” I think that is why so many people take mind-altering substances. Yet! Robin Williams said, “Reality is just a crutch for people who can’t handle drugs.” I don’t take mind-altering substances but I don’t see reality as any sort of crutch.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Bill says:

            And from the Stones, “Mother’s Little Helper” 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  13. Oh for shame.
    A promise should not be so easily broken.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Well, the original bargain was struck between two different people 150 years prior, so it wasn’t that easy 😉 Thanks for reading and your comment.

      Like

  14. plaridel says:

    it seems that most folks have short memories. Promises, inheritance, and all will last only until the 3rd generation.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Plaridel, I think you’re right — if even that long anymore.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. jwdwrites says:

    How sad. Yet another sign of the times. I had to look up sesquicentennial, I never knew this word existed. 🙂

    Like

  16. GHLearner says:

    I did not read your story before I wrote mine! Promises are broken all the time and no one seems to care anymore. You describe the aging of building and tenant together so well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Gabi, thank you very much. Will be reading yours in a bit, my friend.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Tannille says:

    Ugh. Remember when doing the right thing was considered honourable? All about money these days.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Vartika says:

    It’s a sad story. I am feeling sorry for the people who have to face these problems.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes, it is a very sad story for those folks who have been displaced.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Margaret says:

    A sad story. He was so comfortable and content in his home. I like how you ended this – having him comment on how good the place looks now adds more poignancy to the story. It’s such a shame that this is a reality for so many people.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Margaret, I like the added dimensions you give to the story. Much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. jwdwrites says:

    How strange, I posted a comment here but it disappeared. That is the third one this week! What I wanted to say was that I enjoyed the story and learned a new word -sesquicentennial – and that is always a good thing. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      JWD, so sorry your comments have disappeared. I am always aggravated but never surprised by the ghosts in WP machine. Thank you very much for trying until you got through and for your lovely comment. I probably wouldn’t know that word either except our town had a celebration for it a few years back 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  21. draliman says:

    Leave it a few years and inconvenient agreements tend to be forgotten… 😦

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Laurie Bell says:

    Oh this is sad, but such a long time had passed, generations! I’m surprised the promise lasted that long. A tale of sadness but somehow they still think positively. Nicely done

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Laurie!

      Like

  23. Nobbinmaug says:

    Gentrification is great in theory. Unfortunately, theories don’t always pan out as they should.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      They pan out well for the wealthy but not so much for those just scraping by.

      Liked by 1 person

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