Verdict Analysis: addendum to Team Johnny or Team Amber?

Since first posted, the verdict has come in. I’m still trying to wrap my head around it. Going out to youtube (one of my sources for varying impressions on topics) I found this video opinion that gives a well-reasoned response to the request that someone gave him to analyze the verdict. Please, share your thoughts. I really want to know what you think.

https://ibpsnews.in/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/johnny-depp-alpacas-165310854716x9-1068x601.jpg

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I usually don’t go in for these kinds of scandal things, but there is something about the courtroom drama playing out between Johnny Depp and Amber Heard that has held my attention, even as I hold the puke bucket close by just in case I start wretching.

One thing I have noticed is that people are taking sides.  Johnny seems to have the lead in the popularity contest, but that’s just an impression.

I pity the judge having to decide who gets or doesn’t get what.

So… if you have been following the debacle, what are your thoughts?  My vote is with Johnny.  He probably did most everything she said, but she failed to mention all that she did.  They are equally wrong, but her career wasn’t destroyed because of his allegations (until now?)

76 Comments Add yours

  1. memadtwo says:

    They deserve each other.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      lol. I can’t argue with that.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. memadtwo says:

    And less of our attention.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I can’t even begin to imagine how much this trial is costing them…

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sheree says:

    Six of one, half a dozen of the other snd frankly, who cares?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Badfinger (Max) says:

    Johnny…not because I’m a guy either…he just seems more genuine and when your ex-wife defends you and every other woman in your life ever…saying it never happened with them….I believe Depp.
    I think Johnny wins….even if he loses this case. I don’t think he expects to win the case…it would be almost impossible.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I think he has redeemed himself and at minimum shown what a slimeball Heard is. It is genuinely difficult to fathom what he saw in her in the first place. I can only guess he was so stoned out of his mind he saw a party mate.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Badfinger (Max) says:

        That is the only thing I can see…. his last French wife was just awesome.
        I think he will be a little more careful now lol.

        Liked by 3 people

        1. msjadeli says:

          I think you’re right, Max. I hope he stays off of the mind-altering substances also.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. Badfinger (Max) says:

            Yea that didn’t help…I agree and I hope he is off of it. I do think this more important than some people think Lisa…. I don’t know if you will agree…it goes beyond a celebrity match…. If someone openly accuses you of something without proof…. is this deserved without hearing both sides?

            Liked by 1 person

            1. msjadeli says:

              Max, I think Johnny did the right thing by pushing back if he was innocent. I can only imagine how painful it must be for him (and her!) to have all of that dirty laundry aired to the world. I absolutely agree that what he is doing is important beyond their celebrity.

              Liked by 1 person

  5. I think Amber is exposing herself as a bit bizarre and it will probably tarnish her career. I’m with Johnny but probably because I’ve always been a fan since childhood. Maybe I’m biased. But the shit the bed debacle… whoa!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I think what got me was right after she had reported she’d been the victim of Johnny’s domestic violence she was seen on a surveillance video joking around and throwing fake punches back and forth with her sister. I’ve known plenty of DV victims, including myself, and I can NOT imagine kidding around about it like that! Ever!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Yeah. She seems dishonest, but I try not to lean into that too much. Celebrities, pfft

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Ron Rowland says:

    I’ve only been half paying attention — watching small clips. I am waiting for the movie to come out so I can take it all in.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      LOL I’m sure you’re right there will be a movie. Who do you think will play Johnny? Amber? The judge? I feel sorry for that judge!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Paula Light says:

    I think they’re both awful people, but I believe her that he gets violent and horrible when drunk/high. Just look at those disgusting texts he sent about her for evidence of his ugly emotions. I do think he’s a better actor than she is, which is why people are supporting him, forgetting that he is acting in court, just as she is. He’s just better at it. Either way, they’re both grossly wealthy and spoiled brats. Yuck!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Paula, you nailed it. He is really good at acting, and narcissistic abusers are experts at acting. Yes, some of those texts that I saw between him and some other guy (I’m guessing) with all of the misogynistic crap in it was disturbing. I think they both gave it back and forth to each other.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Phil Strawn says:

    Why are these two narcissistic fools still in the news? Considering all the mayhem going on in our country 24-7, we have to read about them? Well, at least they aren’t as despicable as the Kardashians, and now we have Steven Tyler to hold our interest.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      It shows what a distasteful reality our country resides in when I prefer Johnny and Amber to what’s happening elsewhere here and in the world. I hadn’t heard anything about Steven. Wassup with him?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Phil Strawn says:

        He ditched his sober days and is now back in rehab so their Las Vegas residency show has been postponed. How old do you have to be to keep those days behind you? Steven still thinks he is in the 70s, wait! He is in his 70s.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          So sorry to hear that. I think there are a fair # of people who never do…

          Like

  9. Dave says:

    team Amber or team Johnny? How about Team None of the Above? I like Depp as an actor, but both of them seem like a**h***s in real life… a defamation suit where both end up looking worse than they did going in. Still it does seem like he’s maybe a bit more honest than her. I haven’t watched much but must admit he makes me laugh being so matter of fact, her lawyer reading some shocking text from him and asking ‘am I reading that right?’ and him just deadpanning ‘yes you are.’

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I’m glad he appears to be clean and sober now and so does she. If the trial goes on long enough maybe they will both stay that way…

      Like

  10. CARAMEL says:

    People are taking sides, and unashamedly so. I heard someone bellowing across the office while on the phone to a supplier the other day, and they are obviously convinced they know exactly what is going on.

    I have not been watching, but the BBC News has covered some of the developments. But between them, they are giving me additional reasons to continue my three year plus boycott of the cinema (which was obviously mostly because of covid, but maybe now is because I have lost interest in sitting in the dark with strangers watching people mess around on the screen when there are so many more worthwhile things I could do with my time).

    From the little I have gathered is going on I have discerned that we have at least one film star who seems to immersed themselves in an excess of drugs and alcohol, but seems to distinguish that after Weinstein-gate, Hollywood and the public can forgive atrocious behaviour so long as it does not include violence or sexual assault. Whether he is guilty of the latter, the former is enough to remind me that I knew there was a reason why I never watched this man’s films. There is nothing I am liking about what I hear about him.

    I don’t know who the lady is. I don’t know if she imitated some of his disgusting habits when it comes to drugs and alcohol or whether she made healthier choices? But it is hard to understand why anyone would enter a relationship with a person who was abusing drugs and alcohol, unless they were blinded by inexperience and sentiment. I had no idea of her connection with him. I thought he was with Winona Ryder, but that is how long since he was on my radar. I have never seen any of her work. It is hard to comprehend the scale of this situation for her, as I believe that many people who know nothing about her have judged against her before the judge/jury have.

    I think that when a relationship deteriorates – then usually both parties find it hard to maintain their calm, their behaviour. (Although I have known some cases when it was much clearer that one person was wholly responsible for the abuse.) It is not hard to imagine that both of them have said and done things that were harmful. This aspect of violence…it is hard for me to have an opinion about two people I know next to nothing about. But I have been assigned to work with plenty of abuse victims. I know plenty of couples whose relationships became living nightmares…and screaming and violence occurred repeatedly (the one who ended up with the black eye was not necessarily without blame). I have seen relationships break apart because there seemed no hope of improvement, I have known of women who have fled for their own safety (I have even helped them escape), and I have also seen couples work to restore their relationships and make extraordinary changes. But these were people who were or fairly ordinary means. I think that when we are talking millions of dollars – it all starts to raise eyebrows.

    For me on a very personal basis, this is why I dread the day I have to appear in court to face the man who assaulted me. These court cases are horrible, beyond horrible. Manipulative law professionals who twist everything and make you appear like a complete fake. I literally dread being in that boat. I have nightmares about it. My family and friends have all repeatedly assured me that if that day comes they would support me through it, but right now I still do not think I have the courage or confidence to stand before cocky legal beagles who want to cast doubt on everything. It would be beyond any trauma I have already faced.

    I do wonder why anyone would go to court if they did not genuinely have a case.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you so much for your thoughtful response to the question, Mel. I think Johnny has good grounds of saying she helped destroy his career with the article she wrote. Not so say he didn’t contribute to it’s going down the tubes. I think he went to court because he needs to get back to work earning millions. Hopefully this trial does it for him. Amber is a nobody in the world of cinema compared to him and probably seduced him so she could divorce him and get a nice settlement. My guess is as good as anybody’s….

      Like

    2. fgsjr2015 says:

      Clearly, there are serious mental health issues involved. In the case of Johnny Depp — and men, in general — I quote from The Highly Sensitive Man (2019, Tom Falkenstein, Ch.1):
      Author and psychologist/psychotherapist Falkenstein also writes that,

      “While it is true that a higher percentage of women than men will be diagnosed with an anxiety disorder or a depressive episode, the suicide rate among men is much higher. In the United States, the suicide rate is notably higher in men than in women. According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, men account for 77 percent of the forty-five thousand people who kill themselves every year in the United States.

      “In fact, men commit suicide more than women everywhere in the world. Men are more likely to suffer from addiction, and when men discuss depressive symptoms with their doctor, they are less likely than women to be diagnosed with depression and consequently don’t receive adequate therapeutic and pharmacological treatment. …

      “This is backed up by numerous psychological studies over the last forty years that tell us that, despite huge social change, the stereotypical image of the ‘strong man’ is still firmly with us at all ages, in all ethnic groups, and among all socio-economic backgrounds. In the face of problems, men tend not to seek out emotional or professional help from other people. They use, more often than women, alcohol or drugs to numb unpleasant feelings and, in crises, tend to try to deal with things on their own, instead of searching out closeness or help from others.”

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I have seen enough to believe that the only thing worse than Depp, Heard, and their legal drama are the people who are so caught up in it that they are choosing sides and ignoring their own partners and families while this drivel goes on.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      It’s called escapism. Real life is a bitch. This is entertainment.

      Like

      1. I guess. Seems to me if people spent more time focussed on living their lives instead of getting so caught up in garbage like this, they would eventually have lives that they do not want to escape from. 🙄

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Each cat their own rat.

          Liked by 1 person

  12. Acid Kritana says:

    HE WON!!!!!!!!!! I’m having a party when I get home.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      After I read this I went to youtube to watch the verdict read. YES!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Acid Kritana says:

        My friend Daniel (girl version) watched it live while our classmate Strahenja made muffins (they weren’t necessarily the best lol, I’m pretty sure I’m the only one who liked them lol), and we along with some other classmates watched it in real time. It was epic.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Oh wow, that *is* epic. What are your thoughts on the whole thing?

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Acid Kritana says:

            That we’re finally one huge step closer to justice.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. msjadeli says:

              Interesting perspective. Not sure if I’m totally in agreement, but I do think it makes an important statement in a lot of different ways. My sons and I were playing an online game the other night that included a pirate and I called the pirate Depp. My son said, “That’s LORD Depp.” I thought it was funny.

              Liked by 1 person

  13. CARAMEL says:

    I have found it tough Li. Despite trying to avoid the case, it seems to have been talked about everywhere I go. I mentioned in a comment I left on another post of yours that I find it easy to believe that they both behaved poorly. I have seen the damaging effect that alcohol and drugs can have on people’e behaviour, and I have seen so many cases of relationships that have deteriorated to the point of vicious behaviour and acts of rage. I don’t find it hard to believe that their relationship became extremely unhealthy.

    I think in the current climate, both Hollywood celebs and everyday Joe Bloggs seems to be allowed to use their free will to live whatever kind of lifestyle they want, and although alcohol and drugs are so destructive, they just don’t seem to be viewed in as poor a light as they should be. They sometimes seem to be glorified. But in recent years – it is the exploitation of women, violence especially sexual violence that has become the ultimate crime/sin – and in the case of men like Weinstein, it has ended careers and resulted in judicial sentencing. So, if a man is accused of actions like abuse, I can see the consequences could be severe.

    I know first hand the damage that can be caused when others take to the public domain to accuse you of negative things. I was defamed on social media for things that I would never dreamed of doing. It had a terrible impact on my life – the way others viewed me socially and professionally. So I do understand that if someone feels they are being maligned publicly they would seek vindication.

    I just find it very difficult that what ultimately was about a relationship that in private clearly deteriorated to a very low ebb, has become such a public display. Having your personal relationship raked up – all those awful details – awful intimate details, broadcast to the world, analysed forensically…oh it is awful.

    I am not entirely sure that this has had a harmful effect on Depp’s career though. The fandom movement seemed determined to support him no matter what the legal verdict. A friend of mine was telling me that since this started, his movies have been on every weekend on UK TV (and she commented that it is the same with Will Smith movies), and I suspect that even if Heard had won the case, they would continue showing Depp movies. So I sometimes wonder if the adage – even bad publicity is good for those who want fame. Although I can imagine some organisations would be careful about who they associate themselves with.

    As I have mentioned before, on a personal level, it makes me even more terrified of facing my attacker in court. If I had to go through anything like that court-case, I think it would break me into a million pieces. I can imagine there may be others who have similar fears to me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Mel, I am so very glad you took the time to make a thoughtful comment on the situation. You bring up so many different aspects of the whole sordid mess. Like you mentioned the idea of having my previous relationship with my ex-boyfriend aired in minutiae for the world to see, and to have to sit there in a courtroom with cameras trained on me the whole time could be so painful and nerve-wracking in so many ways. Yet I think about both Johnny and Amber and how something has driven them each to enter the celebrity arena (beyond just money, I feel certain) and can’t help but wonder if the adage you cite is correct. Honestly, if that is the case, I think it backfired on Amber. Mel, I hope you never have to enter that courtroom with your attacker. I hope cosmic karma takes care of him first.

      Like

  14. Badfinger (Max) says:

    I thought it was interesting. This is just as much society’s fault as it is hers…Everyone should have asked…where are the facts when she came out with that? They judged someone before hearing all of the facts. Disney…I can’t stand them because they jumped the gun also and fired him. They have done that in the past.

    Who is a bigger star doesn’t matter to me…the evidence was in his favor.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Max as much as I like the pirates movies and other disney things (thinking of a certain Peter Jackson offering) I see them as a hub of real evil. It’s time for Johnny to get back to what he truly excels at now that he’s clean and sober: serious acting. Amber? Don’t ask me what I think she should do next lol

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Badfinger (Max) says:

        I think the same about them! Oh she is in Aquaman! Lol

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Ugh. I had heard some stuff about no chemistry between her and Momoa but who knows what the truth is. We’ll see if she’s in the sequel…

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Badfinger (Max) says:

            I did hear that when the trial was half over…he started to follow Johnny on twitter or something lol.

            Liked by 1 person

    2. fgsjr2015 says:

      On a purely professional level, when an article is published, a letter to the editor is then published that rebuts. But in the case of the Guardian Weekly’s May 27 opinion piece unconditionally supporting Amber Heard as THE victim, and rather unreasonably I might add, it was then complimented, rather than countered, by yet another Amber-Heard-as-THE-victim opinion via letter to the editor in the following issue. The mainstream news-media should, but apparently don’t, remain objective, even on such seemingly-sacred-cow social-issue topics as gender, and its relevant/related politics. …

      As for Depp himself, he likely was the strong/silent guy for a long time, until Heard and self-medicating. … There stubbornly remains an outdated general societal mentality, albeit perhaps subconsciously held: Men can take care of themselves, and boys are basically little men. It’s the mentality that might help explain why the book Childhood Disrupted was only able to include one man among its six interviewed adult subjects, there being such a small pool of ACE-traumatized men willing to formally tell his own story of childhood abuse.

      It’s a continuing subtle societal take-it-like-a-man mindset; and one in which so many men, even with anonymity, would prefer not to ‘complain’ to some stranger/author about his torturous childhood, as that is what ‘real men’ do. [I tried multiple times contacting the book’s author via internet websites in regards to this non-addressed florescent elephant in the room, but I received no response.]

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Badfinger (Max) says:

        I have found we are usually what generation we grow up in…you do adapt in some ways but many times your core remains…So yes I can see what you are saying.

        I’ll be the first admit it wouldn’t be the easist thing for me. On top of that to tell it to the whole world be a complete other thing.

        As far as this trial…for me it represented society’s mob mentaility to jump and codemn someone without proof…and yes the mass media jumps on the bandwagon.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. msjadeli says:

          Well-said, Max.

          Like

        2. fgsjr2015 says:

          Yes. … Maybe mainstream journalism has largely become a profession that’s motivated more by a buck and a byline — i.e. a regular company paycheque and a frequently published name with stories — than a genuine strive to challenge the powers-that-be in order to truly comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable in an increasingly unjust global existence.

          Also, journalism’s traditional function may have been quietly changed. The adage-description of journalism’s fundamental function can remain the same, but revision of terminological representation is definitely in order. While it remains “comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable,” there has been a notable mainstream-news-media alteration as to what/who constitutes an “afflicted” and “the comfortable”.

          Meanwhile, every culture/nation has its own propaganda and core beliefs, true and false; though some culture/nations — usually the biggest, most powerful — are much more corrupt and brutal than the smaller, weaker ones. And western mainstream news-media are a significant part of this moral problem. Yet, the editors/journalists likely sleep well at night, nonetheless.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. Badfinger (Max) says:

            I agree it has been going on forever… Hearst in the 20th Century did it for a long time… but now the difference is…they really don’t try to hide it.

            I was a kid when Walter Cronkite was on the air…what I remember mostly and correct me if I’m wrong about most of the broadcasters back in the 70s and 80s…they read facts from a paper.

            They did have editorials where someone just said what they thought…now the western news is one big editorial.

            I’ve watched Fox and Msnbc…and it is so obvious. I don’t look at it as news anymore…I look at it as almost sports teams. You have the conservative team and liberal team…and they don’t let facts get in the way. It’s a competition now. I don’t mean just for ratings but for new blood for their side….which in turn helps ratings.

            Liked by 2 people

            1. msjadeli says:

              Yes, Max, with you all of the way on that view.

              Liked by 1 person

            2. fgsjr2015 says:

              I basically agree. …

              Canadian media conglomerate Postmedia is on record allying itself with Canada’s fossil fuel industry, including the mass extraction and export of bitumen, the dirtiest and most polluting crude oil. [“Mair on Media’s ‘Unholiest of Alliances’ With Energy Industry”, Nov.14 2017, TheTyee.ca]. Also, a few years ago, Postmedia had acquired a lobbying firm with close ties to Alberta Premier Jason Kenney in order to participate in his government’s $30 million PR “war room” in promoting the industry’s interests.

              Furthermore, in May of 2021, Postmedia refused to run paid ads by Leadnow, a social and environmental justice organization, that exposed the Royal Bank of Canada as the largest financer of the nation’s fossil fuel extraction. …

              How can allying itself with such an environmental monstrosity possibly be considered ethical journalism? Unless, of course, it has become so systematic thus normalized — i.e. the ethical (and sometimes even the moral) standard has been further lowered — that those who are aware of it, notably politicians and political writers, don’t bother publicly discussing it. …

              Like I said earlier, journalism’s traditional function seems to have been changed. The adage-description of journalism’s fundamental function can remain the same, but revision of terminological representation is definitely in order. While it remains “comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable,” there has been a notable mainstream-news-media alteration as to what/who constitutes an “afflicted” and “the comfortable”.

              For example, an “afflicted” of our contemporary news-media times needing comforting may be an owner of a multi-million-dollar home that’s worth too much, thus taxed higher, and he/she therefore desires tax respite. Or, the new “afflicted” requiring news-media comforting is an already very profitable fossil-fuel-producing corporation that needs more taxpayer-funded subsidies along with our convenient complacency in its multiplying many-fold its diluted bitumen export thus accompanying eco-threats for the sake of even greater profit.

              Liked by 2 people

          2. msjadeli says:

            Thank you again for your well-articulated perspective on it, thid in particular: “there has been a notable mainstream-news-media alteration as to what/who constitutes an “afflicted” and “the comfortable”.”

            Liked by 1 person

      2. msjadeli says:

        Thank you much for posting your information here. I agree that men are programmed almost from birth to be tough and never admit they are hurting. Girls are trained in other ways that harm them also.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. fgsjr2015 says:

          Indeed, quite. … As a ‘difficult’ boy with autism spectrum disorder, ACEs and high sensitivity (thus not always easy to deal with), the first and most formidably abusive authority figure with whom I was terrifyingly trapped was my Grade 2 teacher (Mrs. Carol), in the early 1970s. Although I can’t recall her abuse in its entirety, I’ll nevertheless always remember how she had the immoral audacity — and especially the unethical confidence in avoiding any professional repercussions — to blatantly readily aim and fire her knee towards my groin, as I was backed up against the school hall wall.

          Fortunately, though, she missed her mark, instead hitting the top of my left leg. Though there were other terrible teachers, for me she was uniquely traumatizing, especially when she wore her dark sunglasses when dealing with me.
          But rather than tell anyone about my ordeal with her and consciously feel victimized, I instead felt some misplaced shame. And as each grade passed, I increasingly noticed how all recipients of corporeal handling/abuse in my school were boys; and I had reasoned thus normalized to myself that it was because men can take care of themselves and boys are basically little men.

          For some other very young students back then and there, there was Mrs. Carol’s sole Grade 2 counterpart, Mrs. Clemens — similarly abusive but with the additional bizarre, scary attribute of her eyes abruptly shifting side to side. Not surprising, the pair were quite friendly with each other. It was rumored the latter teacher had a heroin addiction, though I don’t recall hearing of any solid proof of that. I remember one fellow second-grader’s mother going door to door in my part of town seeking out any other case of a student who, like her son, had been assaulted by that teacher.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. msjadeli says:

            Wow, that is so horrible! Teachers like that are better staying far from any child and other humans in general. When 2 of them of like ilk connect, they can reinforce the dark impulses in each other. I really wonder how many children were harmed at their hands. They may have been victimizing the girls also, but in other ways.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. fgsjr2015 says:

              I really believe that our standard educators should be properly educated on Autism Spectrum Disorder, especially when it comes to preventing the abuse of autistic students by their neurotypical peers and teachers alike. There likely are students who, like me, have ASD but do not exhibit low-functioning-autism disability traits yet nonetheless struggle with other superficially suppressible traits. [While sometimes told “But you’re so smart,” I know that for every ‘gift’, I’m afflicted with a corresponding three or four deficits. It is indeed crippling, and on multiple levels.]

              Not only should all school teachers receive mandatory ASD training, there should also be an inclusion in standard high school curriculum of child-development science that would also teach students about the often-debilitating condition (without being overly complicated). If nothing else, the curriculum would offer students an idea/clue as to whether they themselves are emotionally/mentally compatible with the immense responsibility and strains of regular, non-ASD-child parenthood.

              It would explain to students how, among other aspects of the condition, people with ASD (including those with higher functioning autism) are often deemed willfully ‘difficult’ and socially incongruent, when in fact such behavior is really not a choice. And how “camouflaging” or “masking,” terms used to describe ASD people pretending to naturally fit into a socially ‘normal’ environment, causes their already high anxiety and depression levels to further increase. Of course, this exacerbation is reflected in the disproportionately high rate of suicide among ASD people.

              Like

              1. msjadeli says:

                I understand everything you’re saying and agree with it wholeheartedly.

                fgs, I don’t think public schools — or any other schools — have a clue about ASD. The farthest they take it that I see is when they do testing for eligibility for special education accommodations, which includes a cognitive part and a psychological observance and other assessment. If they are deemed by the testing and the long oblong table of all of the assembled interested parties (including parents) that the child is eligible they put an “individualize educational plan of teaching” (IEPT) together. There are a lot of problems with this, because when a child it labeled “special” it makes them even more of a target with the mean students. Further, teachers are already stretched to the max (at least in the US) after the republicans broke the back of the strongest union in our country, the teacher’s union, in an effort to cause a domino effect with setting a tone with unions — which they very effectively achieved. Government unions are one of the few left and they have no teeth. Add covid and ongoing school shootings and you’ve got an educational system that is not only broken but actively toxic for all students. Yet when I look at my property tax bill twice a year I see a very large (over 50%) of it goes towards schools, as a few years ago all of the county’s school systems decided they needed new buildings. Forget about devoting funds towards actual teaching. I could go on and on, but I had better stop here. I have a baby granddaughter and I pray my son and his wife decide to home school her or if not be very careful where they choose to have her educated.

                Like

                1. fgsjr2015 says:

                  While I can appreciate that limited funds places constraints on available teaching time and resources, I must disagree that neurodiversity and/or child-development science shouldn’t be taught to high school students “because when a child [is] labeled ‘special’ it makes them even more of a target with the mean students”.

                  As far as Canada’s public school system goes, we’re already labeling as ‘special’ the very small portion of students who identify as non-heterosexual and/or gender-non-binary via mandatory K-12 Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) curriculum.

                  To quote Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint (Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School): “This is the most important job we have to do as humans and as citizens … If we offer classes in auto mechanics and civics, why not parenting? A lot of what happens to children that’s bad derives from ignorance … Parents go by folklore, or by what they’ve heard, or by their instincts, all of which can be very wrong.”

                  Liked by 1 person

  15. I agree that they’re both wrong

    Liked by 2 people

  16. memadtwo says:

    I think we have better things to focus on. They are both at fault in my opinion. But why are we even paying attention? (K)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      The same reason why others drink beer, smoke weed, and shoot up — escape from reality.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. memadtwo says:

        I guess that’s true. All the movies you watch don’t provide that though?

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Watching this is like watching a really bad HBO series. Some part of me believes it’s real and another part believes it’s an elaborate hoax. Maybe it is that part of it that has caught my attention.

          Like

          1. memadtwo says:

            Someone did remark “now we know who the best actor is”.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. msjadeli says:

              Kerfe, it doesn’t really matter to me how well they acted in the courtroom or didn’t. What was presented as evidence makes it clear that they were both egregious and horrible to each other. What isn’t right imo is when Amber went to the public in her essay and presented only one part of the truth, and that lopsided view had very damaging consequences to her former partner, as his career is being a very public celebrity. They are both slimeballs. I really do hope Johnny stays off “the sauce” whatever forms that sauce might take.

              Liked by 1 person

              1. memadtwo says:

                It doesn’t seem to have affected his fan base– I’m not sure what damage was done. I don’t remember her essay at all but she’s just as guilty as he is, and should not be playing the victim. On the other hand, I don’t feel sorry for him–substance abuse is no excuse for that kind of behavior in my book, and should definitely not be rewarded.

                Liked by 1 person

  17. I think they could’ve put all that money to much better use in reforming our gun laws, aiding the fallen, education and rehabilitation for the mentally ill, drug use and addiction research and help, paid childcare for single working mothers and on and on.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You know that is very true. Our priorities and our system of institutions of government and ways of bettering communities are really screwed up in the U.S.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Usually, “all the boys love Mandy Lane”, but not this time. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I hope that the trial helps dispell that mindless infatuation men seem to have with that type of gold-digging, fame-seeking psycho.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We can hope for that. But the result of the trial is that two good artists become freaks for most of the audience. I don’t know where their career will go now.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          I have no doubt that Johnny’s will revive (if he stays off of the sauce, whatever form that sauce might take.) Amber might have a go at making high class porn, or perhaps an escort service? Other than that, she’s a ghost.

          Liked by 1 person

  19. Adelyn Ivy says:

    I Think Amber Heard Is the modern-day Lucrezia Borgia

    Like

    1. msjadeli says:

      Isn’t Borgia the famous poisoner? Who do you see Johnny as, in the modern-day _______?

      Like

  20. Adelyn Ivy says:

    I Think Johnny Depp Is a Awful Man

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

      Like

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