Fandango's One Word Challenge (FOWC) · fiction · Word of the Day Challenge

The Cookie Cutter of Concision

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Fandango’s FOWC is concise, and the Word of the Day is learn.

Please note: this is a work of FICTION ONLY.

In her job, which forced Jamie to often have to give verbal reports in the courtroom, the Judge was often critical of her reports. As anyone is allowed to sit in a public courtroom while hearings are going on, unless specifically prohibited by the Judge (i.e. any high profile case) the dress-downs often took place in front of quite a crowd. The Judge’s chief complaint was Jamie was taking too long to give her reports and recommendations. The fact is that Jamie was detail-oriented and also wanted a sound rationale for her recommendations.

As time went on, it became standard practice for the Judge to stop Jamie halfway through her report and say, “Ms. Smith, you need to learn to be more concise when you stand in front of me. It is hoped one day you will learn this.”

Another extremely annoying habit the Judge had was rarely going along with her carefully thought-out recommendations, based upon intensive interactions with her clients and their service providers. Jamie had to keep her mouth shut, except for saying, “Yes, Your Honor,” despite the strong compulsion to say, “But!….”

John Wick had been placed on parole in June, after serving five years for aggravated rape. He’d been released from prison and placed on a geopositioning system (GPS) tether, where he was allowed only to go to and from his workplace and his group therapy sessions. Between June and his parole review hearing in front of the judge, scheduled for September, there had been multiple incidents of John’s being in the building where he worked but not at his work station, and the therapist report indicated John was at therapy but not participating and instead chatting on his phone during therapy sessions.

At the September review date, Jamie stood and began her verbal report on how John had done since being released from prison. As usual, the Judge interrupted Jamie, saying,

More concise, Ms. Smith. More concise.”

Jamie hadn’t gotten to the part about John’s violating her terms of parole, where she was going to recommend John be placed on house arrest for a couple of weeks to get his attention; with a plan if that didn’t work, a formal parole violation would be filed.

When it came time for recommendations, the Judge heard them, and disdainfully stated, “Ms. Smith, I see no sense in those recommendations. We will continue the order from June and have another review in 90 days.”

John Wick had a huge smile on his face as he walked past Jamie out of the courtroom.

Two weeks later, Jamie heard on the radio on her way to work that two women had been viciously raped the night before at the building where John went for his therapy sessions. One had been strangled and died and the other was in intensive care. When she got to work she called the therapist to confirm that John was in class last night. The therapist stated John showed up for class but he left to use the restroom about 10 minutes in and never returned.

DNA samples were taken from the victims, confirming that John was the attacker of both women. He was quickly arrested and put in jail.

At John’s arraignment, the attorneys did most of the talking. When the Judge asked Jamie if she had anything to add, Jamie said, “Judge Jermy, you need to learn to listen to everything your parole officers have to say, as the blood from the rapes of both and the murder of one of these two victims is ON YOUR HANDS.”

The Judge ordered the bailiff to arrest Jamie and jail her for an undetermined amount of time for contempt of court.

15 thoughts on “The Cookie Cutter of Concision

    1. While she still sits there in her jail cell, waiting for the judge’s ego to subside enough to order her release. And of course she’s terminated and can’t get rehired by anyone in the field again…

      Liked by 2 people

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