(c) all rights reserved · music · Song Lyric Sunday

#SLS — twofer — Steve Earle’s Mystery Train Part II and Elvis Presley’s Mystery Train

Jim Adams is the steady host of Song Lyric Sunday.  Jim says:
This week the prompt is Train songs and I feel that everyone should be able to find a song that fits this theme.
Here are the “rules”:

• Post the lyrics to the song of your choice, whether it fits the theme or not. If it does not fit, then please explain why you chose this song.
• Please try to include the songwriter(s) – it’s a good idea to give credit where credit is due.
• Make sure you also credit the singer/band and if you desire you can provide a link to where you found the lyrics.
• Link to the YouTube video, or pull it into your post so others can listen to the song.
• Ping back to this post will eventually work, as long as you are being patient, but you can also place your link in the comments if you don’t like to wait.
• Read at least one other person’s blog, so we can all share new and fantastic music and create amazing new blogging friends in the process.
• Feel free to suggest future prompts.
• Have fun and enjoy the music.

Image result for steve earle
Steve Earle image link

Image result for elvis presley

 

 

 

Elvis Presley image link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This post is a reblog of the one I did on 8/12/19.  As these are the best train songs I can think of they are worth a second listen.  Enjoy!

Per wikipedia:
Train a Comin’ is the fifth studio album by Steve Earle (his first in five years), released in 1995. In addition to Earle, it features Peter Rowan, Norman Blake, Roy Huskey, and Emmylou Harris. The album was nominated for a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album.

Train a Comin’ was the first album recorded after Earle overcame his addiction to drugs in the fall of 1994, after being convicted for possession. Earle’s last studio album had been the 1990 album The Hard Way, and he essentially stopped touring by 1992 as his addiction worsened. Most of the songs on the album are older material written when Earle was in his late teens and twenties.

Earle drew on established bluegrass and acoustic instrumentalists for the album, which was a departure from his earlier work with backing band the Dukes. He said to an interviewer at the time that he was seeking an older sound, and the album was recorded in just five days. “I was goin’ for a sound where it sounded like old Opry stuff, where everybody stepped around the mike, which is real close to what we actually did. It ended up being even more of an organic record than I thought it was gonna be.

Personnel:
Steve Earle – guitar, high string guitar, 12 string guitar, harmonica, mandolin, vocals
Peter Rowan – mandolin, mandola, gut string guitars, vocals
Norman Blake – Hawaiian guitar, dobro, mandolin, fiddle, guitar
Roy Huskey, Jr. – acoustic bass (and inspiration on “I’m Looking Through You”)
Emmylou Harris – vocals on “Nothin’ Without You” and “The Rivers of Babylon”

Mystery Train part II is the first track on the album. There are others I like as much or better, but this one doesn’t make me cry.  The musicianship is so good!  Being the curious person I am, I wondered if this is part II, where is part I.

Songfacts.com says:
“Mystery Train” was written and originally recorded by Junior Parker in 1953 for Sam Phillips’ Sun Records (Phillips gets a co-writing credit). Parker was a renowned Blues musician from Memphis who is best known for this song. He was known more for his singing than for his guitar playing, and never achieved the popularity of players like Buddy Guy and B.B. King. Parker was just 39 when he died in 1971 of a brain tumor.

Elvis Presley recorded the most famous version of this song, also on Sun Records, in 1955. His version was ranked #77 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and is his best-known song that was never a hit – it was released as the B-side of “I Forgot To Remember To Forget.” Other artists to cover the song include Bruce Springsteen, Paul Simon, Ricky Nelson, Tom Fogerty, and The Doors.

Wikipedia says about Mystery Train:
Music historian Colin Escott noted “One of the mysteries about ‘Mystery Train’ was where the title came from; it was mentioned nowhere in the song”. The song uses lyrics similar to those found in the traditional American folk music group Carter Family’s “Worried Man Blues“, itself based on an old Celtic ballad, and their biggest selling record of 1930:

The train arrived sixteen coaches long
The train arrived sixteen coaches long
The girl I love is on that train and gone

Parker’s lyrics include:

Train I ride sixteen coaches long
Train I ride sixteen coaches long
Well, that long black train carries my baby home

Today is going to be a Twofer. Enjoy!

There’s a train a comin’
There’s a train a comin
Hear them tracks a hummin’
There’s a train a comin’
Can’t you hear her blowin’
Can’t you hear her blowin’
Wonder where she’s goin’
Can’t you hear her blowin’

Run down to the station
Run down to the station
Dread and fascination
Run down to the station

Don’t you want to ride her
Don’t you want to ride her
Wonder what’s inside her
Don’t you want to ride her

She ain’t bound for nowhere
She ain’t bound for nowhere
Engineer just don’t care
She ain’t bound for nowhere

She run down the mountain
She run down the mountain
She won’t even slow down mmm down the mountain

There’s a train a comin’
There’s a train a comin’
Can’t you hear her hummin’
There’s a train a comin’
Songwriters: Steve Earle

Train I ride, sixteen coaches long
Train I ride, sixteen coaches long
Well, that long black train got my baby and gone

Train, train, comin’ ’round the bend
Train, train, comin’ ’round the bend
Well, it took my baby, but it never will again
No, not again

Train, train, comin’ down, down the line
Train, train, comin’ down, down the line
Well, it’s bringin’ my baby ’cause she’s mine, all mine
She’s mine, all mine

Train, train, comin’ ’round, ’round the bend
‘Round, ’round the bend
Train, train, comin’ ’round, ’round the bend
‘Round, ’round the bend
Well, it took my baby, but it never will again
Never will again

Songwriters: Herman Parker Jr. / Sam Phillips

26 thoughts on “#SLS — twofer — Steve Earle’s Mystery Train Part II and Elvis Presley’s Mystery Train

        1. Was it the Dale McCourey band?? Speaking of great bluegrass bands, have you heard of the Steep Canyon Rangers? They played with Steve Martin and Edie Brickell on a post I did a few weeks back, but these guys are phenomenal without those 2. One of my friends came down to The Canyon and saw them this summer with her daughter.

          Like

          1. Steve later did a bluegrass album with Del McCourey Band- but this was a band of random bluegrass players. I didn’t see him on the The Mountain- [the album he did with the McCourey band} tour- he didn’t come around here on that one for some reason.

            Liked by 1 person

  1. Both of these train songs were new to me. I liked both. I do like the bluegrass sound of the first one, but then Elvis did good, too. I know songs do have the same titles sometimes, but these seem to be two wholly different songs, with the sound and the lyrics. Interesting… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Steve Earl has such a distinctive voice. He was extremely popular in the C&W dance clubs here back in the 90’s. The line dance to his song “Copperhead Road” is still popular to this day and takes a lot of energy to do all the way through! “Snake Oil” was another good one. I had no idea why he disappeared from the spotlight, thanks for the background information.

    I’ve also never been a big listener of Elvis, but this was a good one! Makes you move in your seat for sure. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.