#Haiki Challenge #113 — fallen leaves (ochiba)

Words fall in Autumn
like leaves, wet and fading —
an old man’s life ends.

 

The haiga was written in honor of Matsuo Basho, whose painting here inspired me, as the characters look like falling leaves.

Haiga is a Japanese concept for simple pictures combined with poetry, usually meaning haiku. In Basho’s time, haiga meant a brushed ink drawing combined with one of his single poems handwritten as part of the picture. … Sometimes the poem is handwritten or it can be computer generated, depending on the artist’s taste.

Image information:
Portrait of Matsuo Bashō by Yokoi Kinkoku, c. 1820. The calligraphy relates one of Bashō’s most famous haiku poems: Furu ike ya / kawazu tobikomu / mizu no oto (An old pond / a frog jumps in / the sound of water).

Frank J. Tassone is the host of Haiki Challenge.  Frank says:
This week, write the haikai poem of your choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that alludes to fallen leaves (ochiba)?

24 Comments Add yours

  1. rothpoetry says:

    Great poem Jade!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Dwight, thank you very much.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. rothpoetry says:

        You are welcome!

        Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Reena, thank you 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Indira says:

    Great poem. The picture really resembles a fallen leaf.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Indira, thank you 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Indira says:

        Most welcome, dear.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        A pleasure Li

        Liked by 1 person

  3. memadtwo says:

    Wonderful tribute to Basho. Great imagery. (K)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      K thanks. It was spontaneous. I was looking for def of haiga and saw the pic at wiki.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Reblogged this on Frank J. Tassone and commented:
    #Haiku Happenings #2: Jade Li’s latest #haiga for my current #Haikai challenge!

    Liked by 2 people

  5. This is lovely. And they do look like fallen leaves.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Thank you, Linda.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Jules says:

    I like how the word frog in Japanese also means returning.
    “Frog” in Japanese is “kaeru.” While the kanji/kana involved in writing the words are different, it is pronounced the same way you say “return/to return” (also “kaeru”). As it has been explained to me, frogs can be linked with things/or people returning to a place or origin.

    Thanks for the history of the image. I like how you interpret the characters/ calligraphy as falling leaves 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I so enjoy your Japanese lesson on the connections in language and meaning and am even more happy about the haiga now ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jules says:

        …one of my collections is Frogs… Frogs are very lucky in many cultures. (breep!)

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          I collect frogs also ❤ Not sure why I started but they just drew me to them.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Jules says:

            Positive Luck – that’s what I’m sticking with 😉

            Liked by 1 person

  7. Carol Anne says:

    thats so beautiful! A wonderful tribute to a wonderful man!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, the photo inspired me 🙂

      Like

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