#FF Bright Anchor


Copyright-Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

He was a colorful speaker; a man whose spirit caught others on fire; an anchoring icon to his community since moving to it fifty years ago. It was those abilities that caught the attention of leaders of the new fascist regime. They needed a man like him.

On a Sunday afternoon in June, sunshine and birdsong was in the apple-blossom-scented air. Leaving church after brunch, he walked with spring in his step to his car. His mind was on Miss Jones as he turned the ignition. Debris from the explosion shattered sesquicentennial stained glass windows.

You see, they didn’t have one.

[101 words]

 

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields is the gracious host of Friday Fictioneers.

41 Comments Add yours

  1. neilmacdon says:

    An offer he couldn’t refuse?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      As you say that, exactly!

      Like

  2. pennygadd51 says:

    You’ve been ambitious with this story. The explosion tells us he refused to collaborate with the regime. The thoughts of Miss Jones were, we assume, carnal. In one hundred words, you’ve sketched out a man of conscience, and yet one who suffers the flaws of humanity as he lusts for a young woman. And your description of the beauty of the day tells us subliminally of his zest for life. Really good, Jade!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Penny, I’m glowing with your praise. Thank you very much.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sadje says:

    Great story Li.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Thanks and glad you liked it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        You’re always welcome 🙏

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Nobbinmaug says:

    I really like your description of the serenity of the day shattered by the explosion. It’s a waste. One who is reluctant to lead a fascist regime could be the person to reform a fascist regime.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Hadn’t thought of it that way…

      Liked by 1 person

  5. badfinger20 says:

    Great story Lisa…I had to reread one time to appreciate it…that is a good thing. It makes you think.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glad you enjoyed the story 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. badfinger20 says:

        I really did. It made me think…and you accomplished something doing that!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Well thank you very much. I just started reading a 1300 page Murakami e-book (previously 3 books, but all in one volume). He’s another one of those authors that really gets inside your head.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. badfinger20 says:

            Well you have to let them in some to get the story and the visual…just know when to let it go…not always easy.

            Liked by 1 person

  6. Carol Anne says:

    Awesome story! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m wondering how the community reacted and what the consequences of the fascist regime’s actions were. Did it end there? I wonder. A great take.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      The US has had several church and synagogue bombings/shootings in the past few years as well as other fascist acts of violence. When we have a “leader” (using that term VERY loosely) who praises/condones/fails to condemn the acts, it makes things extremely tense. The bottom line, Keith, is that NOTHING of consequence for the fascists’ acts.

      Like

      1. Worrying times indeed especially when leaders lead us in the wrong direction.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Dear Lisa,

    It took me three times through to get the connection between the last line and the first paragraph. I love the contrasts and the fact that his mind was as far from being a speaker for the fascist regime as he could get. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rochelle, I appreciate your thoughtful comment, thank you.
      Shalom,
      Lisa

      Like

  9. granonine says:

    What Penny said. She’s an amazingly astute critic.

    Sometimes when a movement creates a martyr, it destroys the movement. I hope that was the case here.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you very much, Linda. I hope so also.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. bearmkwa says:

    you created a character that I hated to see disposed of in such a manner. Great writing!

    Like

  11. In the end he wasn’t the man after all… I wonder if he really understood his own role in it all… or was he caught in the fact of being used.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Interesting take on the story, Bjorn. Thanks for your comment.

      Like

  12. siobhan1967 says:

    Yep, didn’t see that coming at all, well done! Words can be such powerful weapons against repressive regimes, we need more of such speakers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks and yes we do.

      Like

  13. Dale says:

    I also had to read it more than once and once it got into my noggin… wow!
    Well done, Lisa.
    Let us hope that martyring him kills the regime – though…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Dale. I’m sorry he was murdered by the fascists.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. A subtle story, I read it more than once to grasp it fully. He sounds like a brave man in the face of a harsh regime.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for reading it and for your thoughtful comment.

      Like

  15. draliman says:

    His bravery in refusing probably saved untold people from being swayed to the regime’s side through his words.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. GHLearner says:

    If we can’t have a brilliant leader, you can’t have one either, right? But this will backfire. Excellent story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes, exactly, and yes. Thank you very much.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. magarisa says:

    Wow! What a gem of a story in only 101 words! The explosion almost made me jump. Excellent writing, Li.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Magarisa, thank you, glad you enjoyed the story 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. magarisa says:

        You’re welcome, Li. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

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