A2Z 2020 — essential oils — Y — Ylang Ylang

Y letter

Historically, ylang ylang has been used in both the East and the West. In the Philippines, where the flowers grow naturally, healers have used this oil in ointments to treat cuts, burns, and insect and snake bites. In the Molucca islands, people used the oil as the main ingredient in Macassar oil, a hair pomade which later became popular in Victorian England. In Indonesia, the flowers are spread on the bed of newlywed couples as they are considered to be an aphrodisiac. – from Majestic Pure

 

Ylang Ylang, Blossom, Bloom, Plant, Flower
ylang ylang

Ylang Ylang (cananga odorata)

Plant appearance: tree around 60 feet high with drooping branches, carrying clusters of large, golden yellow, star-shaped flowers

Part used: flowers

Oil appearance: pale to deep yellow

Therapeutic uses: hypertension, circulation conditions, muscular cramp, menstrual cramp, intestinal spasm, insomnia, nervous tension, stress, nervousness, physical exhaustion, chronic fatigue, depression

Precautions: may cause irritation on highly sensitive skin; skin patch test is advisable. GRAS

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/91/YlangYlangEssentialOil.png/161px-YlangYlangEssentialOil.png
image by Itineranttrader
RECIPE

Romantic bedroom blend (for diffuser)
Palmarosa EO 8 drops
Ylang Ylang EO 3 drops
Clary Sage EO 2 drops
Nutmeg EO 1 drop
Orange EO 5 drops

29 Comments Add yours

  1. jazzfeathers says:

    You know? I don’t think I’ve ever seen the Yang Yang plant before!

    @JazzFeathers
    The Old Shelter – Living the Twenties

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I haven’t seen the plant, but I have some of the oil. It’s *very* heavily scented, almost cloying, and should be used in small doses.

      Like

  2. It is to be used carefully as it can cause headache. I have ylang ylang eo but use it sparingly.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Exactly, Alexandra. I just commented on that a second ago. It’s a heavy, cloying scent.

      Like

  3. Tarkabarka says:

    I have only ever encountered this in shower gels… they smelled nice

    The Multicolored Diary

    Liked by 1 person

  4. soniadogra says:

    The little note in the beginning was rather interesting. Thank you Jade for enriching us with your knowledge of oils during this A to Z. It’s been a pleasure.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Sonia, you are very welcome. It’s been a fun learning experience pulling the posts together 🙂

      Like

  5. Frédérique says:

    I love Ylang-Ylang! In Marquesas Islands (French Polynesia), this is the flower that men use to wear on the ear. Like women wear tiare or hibiscus, men have their flowers too!
    Y is for Young

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      So interesting and cool. I bet it is a fun place to be, where men wear flowers on their ears 🙂

      Like

  6. Arti says:

    Once again, had heard of the herb but never knew what it looks like. I always thought of myself as a curious person but visiting your blog makes me think I can do a lot better:)
    Cheers Jade for adding pictures to their names.
    And after reading Frederiqe’s comment above, I’m even more curious to seek pictures of a flower that even men wear. Nice.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glad you enjoyed learning about Ylang Ylang and yes, the flower men wear has got to be very special. Thank you for reading and commenting, Arti 🙂

      Like

  7. Tamara says:

    Back in the days when you were able to blend your own oil at the Bodyshop, I used to pick Ylang-Ylang, I think primarily for its nice sounding name, but as far as I remember, I liked the smell, too 😉

    Y is for yodeling and other traditional folklore:
    https://thethreegerbers.blogspot.com/2020/04/a-z-2020-switzerland-yodeling.html

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Sounds like a fun place, where you can combine your own oil. A little Ylang-Ylang goes a long way.

      Like

  8. Pradeep says:

    Never heard of Ylang Ylang before. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You are welcome.

      Like

  9. I have never heard about Ylang Ylang! Thank you for the information about essential oils from A2Z. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You are welcome, Shweta!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Kathe W. says:

    Never knew about this plant- thanks for all you have taught us!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You’re most welcome, Kathe. My pleasure.

      Like

  11. A new one to me. It has some interesting properties!

    Y is for …

    Liked by 1 person

  12. It’s my understanding that the time the flowers are harvested for extraction of the essential oil (and of course the location) makes a difference in the strength/scent of the oil. For me it’s one I have to be careful with, using only the tiniest amount or I’m overwhelmed. But I’m guessing the fragrance of the flowers, although likely lovely, aren’t as concentrated in scent as the oil so they’re great to wear.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Ah, yes, I can see where that would be the case.

      Like

  13. Ronel Janse van Vuuren says:

    I love using ylang-ylang for a relaxing bath 🙂

    An A-Z of Faerie: Krampus

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Will have to try that.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Anne Nydam says:

    I don’t think I really know what ylang ylang smells like, but it’s certainly an interesting-looking flower. When things open back up again I’ll have to go to the drug store and find some bath oil to smell!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Pradeep says:

    I have heard about Ylang Ylang but didn’t know so much in detail. Interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. S. M. Saves says:

    Ylang ylang is one of those things I’ve heard of but never quite knew what it was and certainly didn’t realize it was a flower! Because of your post, now I finally know! The diffuser blend sounds like it would smell lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glad you learned about it.

      Like

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