#FF — lullaby

PHOTO PROMPT -Copyright-Rochelle Wisoff-Fields
PHOTO PROMPT -Copyright-Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Tourists returned to the village of Hualong, after enduring five years of rigidly enforced international travel restrictions. Three years prior, laissez faire attitudes and practices had killed or disabled twenty million worldwide. The vaccine was developed from a tropical fungus that could be easily mass-produced.

Mae could hear them in her upper apartment over the incense boutique when the nurse opened the windows and she was awake. The droning hiss of the ventilator had been her only comforting lullaby for so long. It was good to hear the chatter of voices, even if she would never walk among them again.

[100 words]

My story today is focused on what could be considered a fate worse than death from Covid-19. The MC was one of the first struck down by Covid-19 without being killed.

 

Ellehcor Banner FF

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields is the surf-loving vacationer of Friday Fictioneers.

54 Comments Add yours

  1. I guess Mae developed some type of phobia to being around other people, and I hope that doesn’t happen to me.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Mae is a victim of Covid-19 and will spend the rest of her life on a ventilator. As to your fears of being around other people, I feel the same way 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  2. That’s a fate worse than death indeed 😒

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes it would be, but not as bad as 8 years with only the sound of a ventilator…

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Poor Mae. I am glad she found some pleasure in hearing a change in the atmosphere outside. … Even without Covid-19, there are those whose lives are forever changed by stroke or accident or illness and who sometimes end up living behind walls where others don’t know their reality. Your story is a good reminder that there is much suffering we’re not aware of, and can get better at … for, even if Mae is on a ventilator, it does not mean others cannot come visit her and spend time with her …

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for your sensitive and informed comment, Na’ama.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. πŸ™‚ My pleasure .. and, thank YOU!

        Liked by 1 person

  4. neilmacdon says:

    I think it would be tragic to hear the sounds of life returning to normal and not be able to join the throngs

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Gabriella says:

    This is a very poignant and current tale. I feel for her.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Gabriella. I do also.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Iain Kelly says:

    20 million and 5 years – sadly, it is heading that way. The toll on many is huge in many different ways. Good, if bleak story, well written.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Iain. Wishing it wasn’t this way 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Sadje says:

    Very topical story Li.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Indira says:

    ‘Fate worse than death’, indeed. Scarry. Very well written.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you much, Indira.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Indira says:

        My pleasure, dear. You write so well.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          πŸ™‚ ❀

          Liked by 1 person

  9. plaridel says:

    she should think positive and not lose hope.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I’m sure she has a better chance to now. Maybe she’ll be able to heal and start being a part of life again.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. memadtwo says:

    People are not really talking much about the lingering effects of this disease–we don’t even know what will show up later in chronic problems, maybe even for those without strong symptoms. “Normal” will be impossible for many. (K)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      😦 best not to think too much about it.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Dear Lisa,

    There are no promises with this plague, are there? Thoughtfully written piece. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rochelle, thank you very much, no there aren’t. Welcome back from vaca!
      Shalom,
      Lisa

      Like

  12. Bill says:

    Good story. Real life and how it can be.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Bill.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Bill says:

        You’re welcome.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. granonine says:

    Life on a ventilator seems to me like death waiting to be unplugged. Chilling.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      It would be horrific, I’m sure. With the new sounds maybe she will find some respite.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Frighteningly realistic story! I’m doing my best to avoid catching the virus but you can only do so much.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks for reading and your comment, Susan.

      Like

  15. James McEwan says:

    If anything she has survived and also there is a very good reason for saving the tropical forests – if they hold the cure for all diseases.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. siobhan1967 says:

    What an awful thing to happen to Mae – and I fear there will be many more like her thanks to the, as you say, laissez-faire attitude of so many governments, mine included.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      😦 yes and yes

      Liked by 1 person

  17. badfinger20 (Max) says:

    No telling what we are going to find out when this is finally over…if it ever is

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      I wish this was just a dream and we would all wake up.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. badfinger20 (Max) says:

        Sometimes I’ll be looking at the window at work and cannot believe this…also looking at pictures 8 – 9 months ago and cannot believe it wasn’t around then.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          If it is one thing this experience is teaching me it is how much people NEED other people. I miss being among others. Before, when there was a choice, I controlled how much contact I had with others. That choice has been taken away from me. It’s not a good feeling.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. badfinger20 (Max) says:

            I agree. I’m not a people person and at first…I didn’t mind but after a month…I didn’t like it at all. So I know what you are talking about.

            Liked by 1 person

  18. Mike says:

    What a sad place to be in. For many Polio once meant life in an iron lung. Good to see you writing.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes, Mike, didn’t think about those poor souls. Thank you.

      Like

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for reading!

      Like

  19. draliman says:

    To hear normality return but never be able to be part of it. Poor Mae.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. magarisa says:

    How sad. At least Mae is taking comfort in the sounds of others getting on with their lives.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      It’s better than what it was…

      Liked by 1 person

  21. This story is powerful and timely in subject matter.
    I didn’t see where it was going until the end. Great take on the prompt.
    Have a wonderful week … Be Safe
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Isadora.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Clear and powerful, and speaks to my worst fears!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you. Mine too!

      Like

  23. Nobbinmaug says:

    That’s terrifying. I’ve read a little about the long haulers who have persistent symptoms and speculation about lingering effects, but your story is heartbreaking and horrifying.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks. I wish it wasn’t a reality for many.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Laurie Bell says:

    Wow, this is deep. A lot of struggle here.
    The description of the sound of the ventilator is heartbreakingly accurate.

    Liked by 2 people

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