Draw a Bird Day — Belted Kingfisher

belted kingfisher drawing _ top half_scaled 030621

scanned copy of the drawing but the platen
wasn’t big enough to capture the whole thing, so…

belted kingfisher camera pic 030621
cell phone photo of the drawing

I first heard about Draw a Bird Day when I saw Kerfe Roig’s post with one. Since then I learned there is a Draw a Bird website with a gallery full of bird drawings. The 8th of the month is the day of the month to post them.

The belted kingfisher is indigenous to this area. When I was growing up, my grandparents lived near a creek and marshland, areas that kingfishers like to live. Where I live now, near a creek, the also like. I’ve heard their distinctive call out back.

The belted kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) is a large, conspicuous water kingfisher. It is depicted on the 1986 series Canadian $5 note. All kingfishers were formerly placed in one family, Alcedinidae, but recent research suggests that this should be divided into three subfamilies.

The only kingfisher in the majority of its range, the belted kingfisher’s breeding habitat is near inland bodies of waters or coasts across most of North America, within Canada, Alaska and the United States. They migrate from the northern parts of its range to the southern United States, Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies in winter. It is a rare visitor to the northern areas of Colombia, Venezuela, and the Guianas. During migration it may stray far from land; the species is recorded as an accidental visitor on several Pacific islands, such as Cocos Island, Malpelo Island, Hawaii, the Azores, Clarion Island, and has occurred as an extremely rare vagrant in Ecuador, Greenland, Ireland, Netherlands, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. The southernmost records of M. alcyon are from the Galapagos Archipelago, insular Ecuador, where it occurs as a migrant in small numbers but apparently not every year.

It leaves northern parts of its range when the water freezes; in warmer areas, it is a permanent resident. A few individuals may linger in the north even in the coldest winters except in the Arctic, if there are remaining open bodies of water.

The belted kingfisher is often seen perched prominently on trees, posts, or other suitable “watchpoints” close to water before plunging in head first after its fish prey. They also eat amphibians, small crustaceans, insects, small mammals and reptiles.

This bird nests in a horizontal tunnel made in a river bank or sand bank and excavated by both parents. The female lays five to eight eggs and both adults incubate the eggs and feed the young. The nest of the belted kingfisher is a long tunnel and often slopes uphill. One possible reason for the uphill slope is that, in case of flooding, the chicks will be able to survive in the air pocket formed by the elevated end of the tunnel.

Source: wikipedia

26 Comments Add yours

  1. Sadje says:

    Nicely done Li

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      πŸ™‚ Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        You’re welcome πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  2. This is a great drawing, Lisa. Poet, drawing artist…You are truly multi-talented. Next thing we know you write a rock song!πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Christian! Oh how I would love to write a rock song (that becomes a hit!) πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Well, Lisa, I’d say one step after the other. Writing a song would be a cool start. πŸ™‚

        While I used to be a pretty active guitar and bass player many moons ago, I pretty much never managed to write anything meaningful.

        Lyrics are hard! I guess in my case there was the added challenge of the language barrier.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Very cool to learn you were an active guitar and bass player. Why did you stop playing? Or do you still play but not as much? About the lyrics, I think I could write them, but what I need to learn more about is the structure of songs and how lyrics fit into the structure. If I wasn’t so A.D.D. I might try to focus on learning it. Is German your first language?

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Intially, I started learning to play classical guitar as a 12-year-old. Fortunately, I had a great guitar teacher, who early on also showed me some folk, pop and pop songs. He was a huge Beatles fan, so that definitely rubbed off! πŸ™‚

            He happened to be a bass player and gave me a start on that instrument as well when I was 18/19.

            Subsequently, I played in two bands for a few years. Then my studies led me to another city, which put an end to my band career. I’ve since pretty much become a closset musician. These days, I’m playing much less, partly due to joint issues.

            And, yep, German is my mother tongue!

            Liked by 1 person

            1. msjadeli says:

              Good to learn more about you and your musical background. Too bad you and Max don’t live near each other, you guys could have some jam sessions πŸ™‚

              Liked by 1 person

              1. Not sure Max would be willing to put up with me. I’ve become quite rusty! πŸ™‚

                That being said, it’s amazing how similar our music tastes are. Oftentimes when I read his comments, I’m like, ‘gee, I could have written that!’

                Sometimes I think we may be related! πŸ™‚

                Liked by 1 person

                1. msjadeli says:

                  Nothing a good can of oil wouldn’t fix πŸ˜‰
                  You know they say about six degrees of separation!

                  Liked by 1 person

  3. Great drawing! I’ve never heard of Draw a Bird Day, thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you πŸ™‚

      Like

  4. ghostmmnc says:

    Wow! Outstanding drawing of the Kingfisher! Seems like I heard about this draw a bird day last year, but then forgot all about it. So nice you get to see these birds where you are. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Barbara, thanks! I know you’re an artist also so your praise makes me happy. I’m going to try to draw one every 8th of the month now. Yes, they have a very distinctive sound, like a crazy woody the woodpecker πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Dora says:

    Should have known your personality would come through even in a bird drawing! Love it, sharp-eyed, fierce, curious, unafraid. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Dora, you just made my day ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  6. memadtwo says:

    What a wonderful face! And lots of good information. One thing I noticed when I did a kingfisher awhile back is how many different kinds there are. I had no idea. I love the idea they have ended up in Ireland.

    The scan is cleaner, but I like the light and shadow on the photo. I often wish I had a larger scanner though. I’m so glad you joined in! (K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks much, Kerfe. It was a lot harder to do than I realized. I used to draw as a kid and enjoyed it, but to look at a photo and sketch it takes time. I appreciate your feedback. Have it scheduled every 8th to keep joining in. I read how it started at the website which was very touching.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. memadtwo says:

        Yes its a great story. I used to try to draw every day–something else I’d like to reclaim. It’s always more scary when you don’t do it regularly–every line seems more important than it is. Some drawings work, some don’t.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. badfinger20 (Max) says:

    Awesome Lisa….I couldn’t draw a stick bird. You did great!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      LOL thanks, Max! It was relaxing like the coloring used to be to draw it.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. sgeoil says:

    Nice drawing. I love the Kingfisher. I didn’t realize it could wander so far!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      It is a cute and amazing critter. Thank you, Heather πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

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