dVerse — Meet the Bar — Ramble On

Nesting Bee-eaters | Bee eater, Beautiful birds, Animals

To ramble on when seasons shift
embed the genes of winged and furred
to group, compelled to far-off trysts
where helices get spliced and stirred.

Embedded genes of winged and furred
express in random nested forms
as helices get spliced and stirred
in slight mutations with each turn.

Expressed in random nested forms,
in warm relief twixt straw and rock,
the slight mutations with each turn
are stronger combos e’er unlocked.

In warm relief twixt straw and rock,
they grow and ready for the trip
with fitter combos now unlocked;
their brighter puzzles now commit.

They’ve grown, are ready for the trip.
They group, compelled to northern mists.
Their brighter puzzles now commit
to ramble on when seasons shift.

My offering today in a pantoum form.
Image link

Peter from Australia is today’s host of dVerse’ Meet the Bar.  Peter says:
Tonight let’s circle round, let’s end where we started.

49 Comments Add yours

  1. merrildsmith says:

    A fun science pantoum! 😀

    Liked by 5 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Haha! Glad you like it, Merril 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      1. merrildsmith says:

        You’re welcome!

        Liked by 4 people

  2. Lucy says:

    Love this!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Lucy!

      Liked by 3 people

  3. The pantoun is an excellent form to express the growth… It’s almost like ferns unfurling.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Many thanks, Bjorn, yes it is.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. A pantoum Lisa – lovely – a koala stamp for you 🐨 – So like the energy building in this – i can imagine those birdies getting ready, talking about it some more and then bam – they’re off.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      :::blushing::: Thank you, Peter. Animals that migrate thousands of miles every season always astound me. Did you hear that dolphins were spotted in NYC harbor? Hoping the flooding in your part of the world subsides. Better than wildfires, but not by much.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. sanaarizvi says:

    This is beautifully encapsulated, Lisa!! 💝💝 I love; “Expressed in random nested forms.” 😀

    Liked by 5 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      So happy you enjoyed it, Sanaa ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Xan says:

    Really well done! It sings! The pantoum calls to me as I like repetition, but I seem unable to muster the patience required for the form.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Come up with the first line which will be the last line and then fill in the rest. Easy peasy! I dare you! Glad you like my take on it, Alexandra 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Xan says:

        haha easy peasy Your mouth to the Muse’s ear!

        Liked by 3 people

        1. msjadeli says:

          🙂 I saw, but heard first, my first robin of the season today. I was going to make it specifically on robins but opened it up to all migrating critters.

          Liked by 2 people

  7. rothpoetry says:

    I love your poem on the instincts of the natural world to ramble on with the season changes and the pursuit of a mate cycling over and over again. Well done!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you and glad you like it, Dwight!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. rothpoetry says:

        You are welcome!

        Liked by 3 people

  8. calmkate says:

    great pantoum about nature Lisa, lovely!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Many thanks, Kate. Glad you enjoyed it.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. calmkate says:

        reading your posts is a real joy Lisa!

        Liked by 3 people

        1. msjadeli says:

          You just made my day, thank you ❤

          Liked by 2 people

          1. calmkate says:

            great keep smiling!

            Liked by 2 people

  9. Dora says:

    Fantastic pantoun — the form perfectly fitting the theme. Well done Lisa. ❤️

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Dora ❤

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Sadje says:

    Lovely poem!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Sadje 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Sadje says:

        You’re welcome 😉

        Liked by 3 people

  11. They are so divinely programmed to “ramble on when seasons shift” and it almost seems like the pantoum form was designed just for them here! 👏👏

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Tricia what a nice thing to say. Much appreciated!

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Ingrid says:

    I really enjoyed this splicing of science with nature, which are all part of the same continuum after all: great pantoum!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Ingrid! The first robin of the season landed in the yard yesterday which was my muse.

      Liked by 2 people

  13. Excellent! I love this!
    Nature is really far more full of helices than circles. Even planetary orbits are really helices because the whole solar system is moving around the galactic centre.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Kate, thank you! Since you are a scientist, what do you think of the concept that galaxies are the cosmic way-macroscopic versions of slow-moving cells?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. cool! I haven’t come across that concept before. It’s interesting, and could make a nice starting point for a sci fi story. As a (pedantic) scientist I wouldn’t try to push the analogy too far. Considering galaxies on a scale such that one cell = one galaxy (about 1 micron to 1000 l.y), galaxies are much simpler than cells, with much simpler interactions between the parts.

        Liked by 3 people

        1. msjadeli says:

          Galaxies as much simpler than cells is mind-boggling!

          Liked by 1 person

  14. kim881 says:

    Great choice of music, Lisa! Led Zeppeling has always been my husband’s favourite band and Robert Plant his idol. Did you take the title from the song or match the song to the title? A pantoum was the perfect choice for genes, groups and splice hellices. I love the rhythm and sounds in these lines:
    ‘In warm relief twixt straw and rock,
    they grow and ready for the trip
    with fitter combos now unlocked;
    their brighter puzzles now commit.’
    Puzzles indeed!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Kim for your wonderful comment and feedback. For the poem, I chose pantoum first, then when I saw the robin I chose migration, and a blog-mate has been covering Led Zeppelin songs all week so I thought of the song.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Yes they are! I picked the prettiest ones I could find.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You did a great job! 😁👍

        Liked by 3 people

  15. badfinger20 (Max) says:

    Good job Lisa….love the entire meaning of it…and the way it’s constructed.

    and of course, I love the song you have at the end.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Max. I love how these guys keep on keeping on with their music. They still sound as good as they did even with a few years under their belt.

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Lona Gynt says:

    Oh! My! Osis!
    I think every 7th grade biology student should read this. What fun! But getting the chance for those helices to mix and splice to fly out into the world takes some hard scrabble sometimes. Love it!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Lovely comment, Lona, and yes!

      Liked by 2 people

  17. Another great poem

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Rainbow! Love your handle.

      Like

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