A2Z 2021 Jethro Tull Songs Day 11 King Henry’s Madrigal (from Stormwatch) (1979)

K letter_scaled

 

Stormwatch is the twelfth studio album by the progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released September 1979. It is considered the last in the trilogy of folk-rock albums by Jethro Tull with Songs from the Wood (1977) and Heavy Horses (1978) being the other two. Among other subjects, the album touches heavily on the problems relating to the environment, oil and money. Stormwatch was notably the last Tull album to feature the “classic” line-up of the 1970s, as drummer Barriemore Barlow and keyboardists John Evan and Dee Palmer all left the band in the months after the Stormwatch tour concluded in April 1980, while bassist John Glascock had died from heart complications in November 1979 during the tour.  He is featured on only three songs on the album (“Flying Dutchman”, “Orion”, and “Elegy”.) Ian Anderson played bass elsewhere on it.

In 2004, a remastered version of Stormwatch was released with four bonus tracks. “King Henry’s Madrigal” is one of those four bonus tracks. Also Glascock plays bass on two of the bonus tracks (“Crossword” and “Kelpie.”)

King Henry’s Madrigal” is a “cover” of a very old song.  It’s an instrumental here but if you follow the 2nd wikipedia link below it will show you the original lyrics.

facsimile of the scores for Pastime with good company, by King Henry VIII. The British Library, London. from 16th Century

Pastime with Good Company”, also known as “The King’s Ballad” (“The Kynges Balade”), is an English folk song written by King Henry VIII in the beginning of the 16th century, shortly after his coronation. It is regarded as the most famous of his compositions, and it became a popular song in England and other European countries during the Renaissance. It is thought to be written for Catherine of Aragon.

Besides Jethro Tull, the song was also subject of numerous other contemporary versions. Renamed as “Past Time with Good Company“, it was included as the third track on Under a Violet Moon, the second album by Renaissance-inspired folk rock group Blackmore’s Night. The song was arranged and played by English progressive/folk rock band Gryphon, appearing on their 1973, self-titled album. Under the title Mainstream, an electronic version was arranged by Peter Howell of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop for the 1983 album The Soundhouse. The first verse of the song was used as the opening to the song “Legacy of Tudors” by symphonic metal band Serenity on their 2013 album War of Ages. Spanish folk band An Danzza have created their own rendering of this traditional English piece in their album “Whispers of the Forest”.

Sources:
wikipedia
wikipedia

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24 Comments Add yours

  1. Lisa,

    “King Henry’s Madrigal” sounds like a song that might be played in the royal court. We’re currently watching the Showtime series, “Tudors” which is based on Henry the VIII. Thanks for sharing! Check out today’s Looney Tunes’ Art Sketch of Kiss Me Cat when y’all get a chance. Happy A2Zing, folks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      So this song fits right in with the Tudors. Cool! Thanks for visiting!

      Like

  2. Dora says:

    How interesting, Lisa, and what a jolly madrigal, as long as you forget the tyrant who wrote it! Music is very democratic that way.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      So happy you enjoyed the song. I hate to think of this song luring in any of his wives 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  3. How interesting that the Madrigal inspired so many musicians to create their own take on it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. J. says:

    Very interesting… I guess this would be considered a music and history lesson?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I guess it would 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I learned quite a lot today and enjoyed the music. Two thumbs up.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks for dropping by, Deborah, and for the rating 🙂

      Like

  6. badfinger20 (Max) says:

    This one does have a medieval sound to it…never heard this one before.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I tried to choose an eclectic bunch of songs showing the group’s range.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. badfinger20 (Max) says:

        They do have a good range. The surprising one one to me was “Inside.” I didn’t know they did that type of songs.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. memadtwo says:

    Perfect for a band like Renaissance. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes! Glad to hear you’re a fan.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. memadtwo says:

        I’m a big fan of traditional music and all its derivatives.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. ahtdoucette says:

    I love the part where you call this a “cover” of a 16th century song. I think the original was better but in my imagination many things are. =D Kidding. This is a really fun song. It does have this medieval sort of feel doesn’t it? But funkified. I’m not sure how I feel about listening to a melody from the guy who killed his wives right? I’m going to tell myself the melody was actually by a minstrel just doing their job.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Wonderful comment, Anne! Glad it inspired you 🙂

      Like

  9. Your reference to the departure of the drummer and the two keyboarders after the tour that supported the album and the bassist’s death during that tour (yikes!) made me take a look at Jethro Tull’s line-ups. I had not realized what an army of members this band has had! It’s impressive Ian Anderson is still around. I guess without him there would be no JT!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      He’s the creative genius of the band. So far all of the songs I’ve chosen were written by him, and I’ve yet to look at one that wasn’t. The genius + artist combination must mean he’s not the easiest person to get along with at times, I would imagine. He is probably very demanding of excellence which also can be offputting to other musicians.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. While I don’t know about Anderson specifically, it sounds plausible to me. There are definitely many big egos in music!

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Anne Nydam says:

    I really enjoy these reimaginings of classical pieces.
    Black and White: K for Kitezh

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I do also, it helps keep them alive.

      Like

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