#FF — The Queen’s Call


PHOTO PROMPT © David Stewart

The tumor can no longer be ignored. Queen Amanita pulses out via Mycelium Highway, OM-ing: Another Stupid Human Alert! Help!

Chitin jurisdictions call kibbutzes. Within an hour, the Oysters, who are well-known altruists, bzz back that they will step up, even though they know it means their disconnect from the net and containment. Oyster spores eject into the airstream. In a matter of days, they’ve converged on Chernobyl, where they build a vast outpost to absorb radioactivity.

Humans, though dense, notice. Mycologists’ gauges tell the story. Clay vaults are prepared. Generation after generation entombs itself for our dear Mother Gaia.

[100 words]

Glossary:
Amanita = a kind of mushroom that has been depicted most often in cultural images
mycelium = threadlike hairs underground that network, communicate with, feed, etc. parts of some fungi
chitin = the substance that makes up the cell wall of mushrooms; it’s the same stuff that builds the exoskeletons of insects
kibbutz =  in this story, a gathering/meeting
oysters = a kind of mushroom
spores = reproductive dust sent out from the gills of some mushrooms
mycologists = scientists whose specialty is fungi

The National Botanic Gardens of Ireland has been putting on some really interesting live meetings through eventbrite that they also record and post later on youtube. The one I watched live this morning was on our cousins, the fungi. Did you know that fungi are our closest living kingdom of relatives, much closer than plants. There was a way to ask questions of the presenter in the chat box. My question was about whether mushrooms could be used to neutralize radioactivity in the soil. The answer is no, but oyster mushrooms will take the radioactivity up in their bodies and out of the soil; they can be then placed in a protective vault away from harming other life. That’s just one tidbit of the very informative presentation.

I’m including a couple of links the presenter gave:
One is where they are turning fungi into leather: mycoworks.com
One is where they turn fungi into an alternative to styrofoam: ecovativedesign.com

Update on 4/22/21:  The video is now up at youtube.  Check it out here.

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields is the gracious host of Friday Fictioneers.

62 Comments Add yours

  1. Nobbinmaug says:

    We can find the cures for all our ills right here. If only the cure were more profitable than the disease, maybe we’d explore some. That’s all very interesting especially the alternative to styrofoam. I can’t believe we still use that shit.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I’ve heard hemp can be used to replace a lot of toxic products as well. As long as profit rules we are doomed. Thank you for reading and commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. jenne49 says:

    And so the Oysters show more humanity than the humans. Great story and I really enjoyed the information about oyster mushrooms. So much knowledge on offer out there for us to learn.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Jenne, thank you, so glad you enjoyed the story and learning about our cousins, the fungi 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. neilmacdon says:

    Interesting take on the “spores”. And educational too

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Neil, thank you! On another topic, I’m almost finished with your book. I’m enjoying it and plan on writing a review afterwards.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. neilmacdon says:

        Thanks so much, Jade. I’m really glad you’re liking Tears of Boabdil and I’ll look forward to the review

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          You’re very welcome.

          Like

  4. ghostmmnc says:

    A very weird looking picture, and your take on it was so good! Interesting about the fungi. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Barbara, thanks! It is a weird picture!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Iain Kelly says:

    We are stupid humans, aren’t we? We really do need to be helped out. Great info too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes and Yes. Thank you, Iain 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. An imaginatively told story and interesting info to boot. Cool and thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Many thanks, D. It was an informative presentation and glad I took notes.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Sadje says:

    Very interesting info ! Thanks for sharing

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You’re welcome. Sadje I learned SO much watching that brief presentation about fungi!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        It well less known fact.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Paul says:

    Neat fact about oyster mushrooms – never knew that (or what oyster mushrooms were!)

    Hey why did the mushroom go to the party —- cause he’s a fungi!

    I know pretty bad – a bad Dad joke is what my kids would say. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Very fungi 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. draliman says:

    Cool and interesting take on the prompt!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Ali!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. pennygadd51 says:

    Very imaginative take on the prompt – well done! I wish we could learn to treat Gaia with a great deal more respect.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks much, Penny, I do also.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Dear Lisa,

    I found it interesting that Chitin districts were called kibbutzes. 😉 couldn’t help it, that jumped out at me. Evocative and imaginative story. Humans do tend to be a bit on the dense side.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rochelle,
      I separated the types of mushrooms into “chitin (mushroom cell wall material) jurisdictions” and each type/jurisdiction called a kibbutz (town hall meeting/gathering) to discuss the distress call. I have always loved the word kibbutz and it was a good time to use it 🙂 Thank you for noticing.
      Shalom,
      Lisa

      Like

  12. judeitakali says:

    Needed a few google searches but enjoyed it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Jude! I have now added the actual youtube of the presentation to the post, so you can also see it that way 🙂

      Like

  13. plaridel says:

    i guess, if that’s the case, eating oysters should be banned and protected at all cost. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Actually they are oyster mushrooms, and I’m glad you said that. The presenter (the youtube is now linked to my story) does say if you’re picking mushrooms, never take all of them. Leave some behind for the ecosystem critters that use them for various purposes and for their beauty for others who are walking in the woods to enjoy.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. plaridel says:

        opps! i think i must have misinterpreted the whole thing. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Sorry, Plaridel, maybe I should add a glossary of mushroom terminology (and probably will!)

          Liked by 1 person

  14. GHLearner says:

    Great story. Mushrooms are fascinating critters and their role for life on Earth is much larger than believed in the past.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Dora says:

    What a most unique take on the prompt, and I love the tone you strike. Maybe it’s just me but I got a Terry Pratchett vibe reading this. :>)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Such a lovely comment, Dora! Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dora says:

        You’re most welcome.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Tannille says:

    It’s a shame how much money, power, and politics influence science. The planet would be a much better place if we could look at, in this case, oyster mushrooms. Magic mushrooms…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes, if we could work collaboratively for our planet’s well-being rather than separately for individual profit.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Sandra says:

    Interesting and informative post. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you much, my pleasure to share.

      Like

  18. It’s not often I leave a 100-word story better informed than when I arrived!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glad to oblige, Keith. Fungi are a fascinating and underappreciated kingdom.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Very imaginative story and with a lot of interesting information to boot. Nicely done!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you very much Brenda. I added the glossary later because it was cryptic to a certain extent.

      Like

  20. Looks like our cousins are more altruistic than us. Very heart-warming story Lisa. And thanks for sharing the information about mushrooms. We know so little about Mother Earth.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Jolly. You’re so right! Yet we act like everything’s known.

      Like

  21. granonine says:

    I read it but didn’t get it until I read the definitions, then went back and read the story again, appreciating the brilliance of your creative mind 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you very much, Linda 🙂 I was truly inspired by the presentation.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. memadtwo says:

    The world is so mysterious and wonderful. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

  23. subroto says:

    That’s an informative take on the prompt. A mycologist must be a fun guy 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      lol Subroto. Just keep saying “fungi are our friends” and soon you’ll be a believer also 🙂

      Like

  24. Dale says:

    Well done, Lisa. I don’t usually read long explanations or additions to a story but this was too fascinating not to!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Dale. Glad you liked the story and decided to learn about our cousins, the fungi 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dale says:

        Indeed! 🍄

        Liked by 1 person

  25. Intriiguing and instructive. An imaginative take on the prompt.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, WWM.

      Like

  26. Laurie Bell says:

    Arghhh I always thought I was related to fungi hahaha
    Fabulous story and so fascinating !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Thanks, Laurie!

      Like

  27. Carol anne says:

    thats so interesting lisa! I live in ireland! But I’ve never been to the botanical gardens!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I think it’s time you paid a visit!

      Like

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