dVerse — MTB — Curwood Castle

resized curwood castle from the suspension bridge over shiawassee river 060221
Curwood Castle on the banks of the Shiawassee River, taken 060221

Day trip, along two roads of perpendicular straight lines,
cuts through endless fields, punctuated by bergs
and a prison. One way ends and then begins curves;
first anchored by a rectangle that serves as a dash between
a poetry of smooth golden-rodded turrets’ curves.
Inside, heavy, burnished oak of narrow staircases curl
ever upward; tree repurposed to vine. At last, portholes
peep on the Shiawassee. A swallow’s nest beholds a statue
of the author holding a pike; memory hooked of long ago,
where the river, with its gentle current, yet flows and curves.

resized birds nest in porthold on 4th floor with curwoods statue below 060221
Porthole on 3rd floor of Curwood Castle‘s turret. The statue below is a life-sized dimensioned accurate sculpture of internationally-known author, James Oliver Curwood, who grew up in Owosso, MI. I’ll be posting a full story on this amazing person and magical place in the near future.

Laura is today’s host for dVerse’ Meet the Bar.  Laura says:

So today we shall write our poem using any style or meter as long as it contains:

1a. Epiphora (aka Epistrophe or Antistrophe ). The repeat lines should for the most part be consecutive although allowances are made for alternates as well as the use of the repeat word with variance. Employ repetitions with the maxim ‘ too often is too heavy’!

AND those who like an extra challenge might like add in some

1b. Symploce – the combined use of anaphora and epiphora. Here is an example from Eliot’s “Prufrock”:

The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the window-panes,
The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes

49 Comments Add yours

  1. Ingrid says:

    Your graceful repetition of ‘curves’ here mirrors the grace of this intriguing castle’s curves. I like how you change from noun to verb in the final line, varying the sense and adding to the flow of the poem.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Ingrid thank you for the wonderful feedback 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I love the gentleness of the word curve, and I could really feel how it might feel with a surprise awaiting with every bend of the road…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Bjorn, I do too. The curved staircases were wonderful.

      Like

  3. your epiphoras are subtle and scattered and blend with matching rhymes, so the reader is drawn along by curves and curls 😉
    “poetry of smooth golden-rodded turrets’ curves.
    Inside, heavy burnished oak of narrow staircases curl
    ever upward, tree repurposed to vine”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Laura thank you very much and thank you for the poetry lesson on epiphoras 🙂

      Like

  4. Beverly Crawford says:

    The river, the road and the castle all echo the word, as does the castle title. This leaves us all waiting for more!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Beverly it was only after I wrote the poem that I realized Curwood’s name fit into the epiphora! Funny how that worked out. Thank you for the kind comment.

      Like

  5. merrildsmith says:

    I like how you work in the shapes–the curls and curves and perpendicular lines.
    It looks like an interesting place to visit.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Merril. It is a neat place, and the lady who works there has so much information about the author, I’d like to go back and talk with her some more. Right next door is an arts center that was closed by the time I left the castle so I will probably visit again.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. merrildsmith says:

        I had to look him up. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Grace says:

    How lovely to read the curls and curves of the place, with the flowing river at the side. It must be fascinating to visit and read history in those walls.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Grace. Curwood had this place built as his writing place. His desk sits near the windows, with the sound of the river at his back. It’s no wonder he was such a fabulous and prolific writer of great northern adventures.

      Like

  7. Glenn A. Buttkus says:

    This is lovely, and it masks and mantles and cuddles the prompt in clever colorful lively geometry.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glenn, thank you. It was such a contrast, how straight the road was and how curvy the destination was…

      Like

  8. Glenn took my words, you cuddled the prompt! 😍 I would love to visit. 💝

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      It’s a heavenly little peaceful niche just a block or so off of a busy traffic business area. What’s weird is you don’t hear anything but the river… Thank you, Tricia. I hope one day you can see it 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. rothpoetry says:

    Beautifully done Lisa. It flowed so smoothly that had to go back and read it again to find the repetition. Well done. Looks like an interesting place to visit!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you very much, Dwight. It truly is. I want to learn more about Curwood and definitely read one of his books.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. rothpoetry says:

        You are welcome! Sounds like a plan!

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Sadje says:

    I enjoyed your trips.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Thank you, Sadje. I’m on a roll (pun intended.)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        You’re welcome!

        Liked by 1 person

  11. the “c” sounds repeated gave this poem such beautiful oral shape, Ms. Lisa. you took us there, with you.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rosemarie, thank you and glad you enjoyed the poem.

      Like

  12. badfinger20 (Max) says:

    I love the picture through the porthole Lisa…that place looks so cool.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      It’s a lovely place for sure. It reminds me of a library, a really cool library.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. badfinger20 (Max) says:

        I love the look of the place and it looks like it would have a cool atmosphere.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          I just posted the big article on it.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. badfinger20 (Max) says:

            Thank you! I will check it out

            Liked by 1 person

  13. memadtwo says:

    What a wonderful building! and even the rhythm emphasizes the curves. (K)

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      It is quite a place. You’ll love the rest of the pics also when I get them posted.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Xan says:

    The repeated u and ur sounds give this a ponderous (in a good), importuning immediacy that belies the lightness expected from the opening description of a “day trip”. (Plus I googled this and, fun rabbithole! It’s a part of Michigan I’ve never visited, and now I want to go!)

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for the feedback, Alexandra. I found this in a book I bought a year or two ago, called, “Lost in Michigan.” There are a bunch of neat-looking, though for the most part obscure places in it. This is the first place I’ve gone to from the book. The lady there was the one the author interviewed for the book. Being in Chicago, it probably wouldn’t take you all that long to get there!

      Like

    2. msjadeli says:

      p.s. just checked. you’re about 4 hours from it.

      Like

      1. Xan says:

        I know! I can’t believe we never went. We used to go to MI all the time!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          I just posted my big write-up on it.

          Liked by 1 person

  15. Helen Dehner says:

    Exquisite … and I got to ride along!

    Liked by 3 people

  16. Dora says:

    Lisa,
    Love how the road trip is one of curves and lines as if history parallels your way in and out of the present into the past. Beautifully written.
    ~🕊Dora

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Well said and great perspective, Dora, thank you. I posted a bigger article on the place an hour or so ago if you want to see what the place looks like inside.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. writingwhatnots says:

    Your poem makes the trip and castle sound enchanting, sweeping the reader round with curves. I love the line ‘ tree repurposed to vine’

    Liked by 3 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Marion 🙂

      Like

  18. Nitesh says:

    Very nice story! While reading the story I was feeling I was there only.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Its a wonderful building.

    Liked by 1 person

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