dVerse — Poetics — Blessed Beneficence

resized abandoned wasp nest 110221

This summer lawn mowing season went fairly smoothly. With front, back, and side lawns and front and back fields to be mowed on the rider, regardless of what time of day and level of cloud and hat cover, it was invariably a relaxing, meditative experience. Except for that day.

The loud, vibrating mower rolled towards one outbuilding on its way back from its back field circuit as my mind lazily mapped out the route leading to the front field. Something was different in the snapshot ahead. My eyes were drawn up to what I was rolling towards: a very active, basketball-sized wasp nest. I did a forced-nonchalant brake, pulled the blade lever up, and put her in reverse, body tensed for what surely would soon be a defensive attack upon me, the invader. The attack never came, and the nest was avoided for the rest of the warm weather.

once slate menacing
then startling beneficence
now vacant castle

resized wasp nest greyscale 110221

Photo taken on 11/2/21, after being abandoned.  Hoping you can see this artifact is quite a bit bigger than a basketball now.  The bottom photo is the same one but in grayscale.

Merril is today’s host of dVerse’ Poetics. Merril says:
You may write about any object—a family heirloom, a museum piece, a monument, or a palace. The choice is yours, but there must be some link to history and the past. You can write in any form or free verse. You might also consider Laura’s prompt from last week’s MTB on fragment poetry.

52 Comments Add yours

  1. merrildsmith says:

    I never would have imagined a wasp nest for this prompt! I’m glad you were not attacked by a swarm of angry wasps. That thing is huge!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Me too on their beneficence, Merril. It’s in a rather sheltered area so maybe it allowed maximum growth?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. merrildsmith says:

        Maybe. Or perhaps they were all out at that time.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. dorahak says:

    That would have given me a start too: “startling beneficience” indeed.
    Pax,
    Dora

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Gillena Cox says:

      Jack Spaniard were common when i was growing up. We rarely see them now in the city suburbs where i now live

      Nice one

      Much💜love

      Liked by 1 person

      1. msjadeli says:

        Gillena, thank you!

        Like

  3. lillian says:

    Wow! That is a HUGE wasp nest! I’d back up too!
    Love the haiku within the haibun here.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Lillian!

      Like

  4. Carol Congalton says:

    So glad the nest was vacant! Yikes!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I made sure we’d had several really cold days before I got close to it for this pic.

      Like

  5. Glenn A. Buttkus says:

    We get wasp nests in our garage eaves every year. We kill themoff before they can attack, but still it is a scary time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glenn, this nest is far from the house so no worries. I did see some up near the top of the roof of the house though this year, where the woodpeckers have been pecking 😦 Something will have to be done in the spring.

      Like

  6. fireblossom32 says:

    When I was walking a mail route, I served a neighborhood with tons of trees. When the leaves fell in the fall, these type of nests were often revealed. There is something both fascinating and creepy about them!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      So neat to see them revealed after the leaves fall. I’ve seen more this year here and there than ever before. I hear you, Shay about the fascination and creepiness.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Sadje says:

    I remember this from last year. I’m glad they moved elsewhere

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I think some moved to my house 😦 Something to look forward to dealing with in the spring.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. rothpoetry says:

    Wow Lisa! It is good you didn’t hit that with your mower. You would have been going one way and your mower the other! Really great photo. Did you cut it out and save the nest? Great Haibun!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Dwight, I think I subconsciously calculated leaving the mower and running vs taking my chances and backing it up. If I would have left it, my running could have set them off. Then when I started it up later to move it, they probably would have attacked. As Ol’ Bill S says, “all’s well that ends well.” No, the nest is still out back, in the wild rose briars. Good place for it 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. rothpoetry says:

        How very interesting! Aren’t you worried they will move in again next summer!

        Liked by 1 person

          1. rothpoetry says:

            You could light a match to it! :>)

            Liked by 1 person

            1. msjadeli says:

              Dwight it’s set in a large bush attached to my barn. Probably not a good idea…

              Like

  9. memadtwo says:

    It’s an amazing structure, but one obviously not meant for human visitors. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Like Shay said, it is simultaneously fascinating and creepy, at least for us humans.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Ingrid says:

    I’ve never seen a wasp’s nest up close. Fascinating, Lisa! Glad you managed to avoid attack 😅

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Same here, Ingrid 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  11. got me squirmish and tensed – afraid of wasp war. happy no sting happened. and empty cave is such a peaceful yet haunting last line.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glad they vacated. I’m hoping winter weather disintegrates it by spring.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Ewwww…. I’m glad you were unharmed!

    -David

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Geez that’s huge. And what a unique entry for this prompt. I was once chased by a bunch of bees while mowing grass so I related.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Yvonne. Sorry you were chased by bees. Hoping you got away unstung. My dentist has a wasp nest outside one of his office windows. When I was telling him and his assistant about the nest, he said he was mowing and had run into one of his landscaping rocks and moved it. He went to move it back and got stung in the face by something that had a nest there. I felt so bad for him!

      Like

  14. And I meant to add, I like your ending haiku.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      🙂 Thank you.

      Like

  15. A wasp’s nest!!! Fascinating, to write about it…I never once was able to view it, despite constantly wanting to… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      They truly are fascinating artifacts. How quickly they are built and continue to grow yet how thin and temporary they are. You’re right, usually I see them high in trees, too far to get a good look.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Xan says:

    I love the use of a natural object to meet the prompt, and also the pareidoliac wasp nest!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Now that you mention it, it does have a face of sorts doesn’t it. Would hate to see the body attached to this head lol

      Like

  17. What an exceptional thing left… I have almost never been stung by a wasp so I feel safe around them actually … still I would have taken a wide look around a castle like that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I’ve gotten stung a few times by something or other over the years, always by accidentally touching them, not by attack. I used to be terrified of all bugs as a kid and screamed if they got near me. Now fairly unconcerned.

      Like

  18. Anonymous says:

    Life is moving in parallel lines for me carrying mr somewhere it’s not clear — but therd sre studebakers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Rob, cruising heaven’s highway in a studebaker is a pleasant thought, the music cranked, and whatever other flourishes you can think of ❤

      Like

  19. hedgewitch says:

    Such a very clever twist on the prompt. I especially love the haiku at the end–an abandoned palace indeed, or wasp mega-church.! I also love mowing my acreage–it’s pure meditation, but sometimes, reality will insist on popping up, mostly when I have drifted off into a meditative state and clipped something the blades don;t care for, like a landscape timber or rock. 🙂 I loved this, and the photo is just amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Joy, glad you can relate to it all. I’ve hit roots and tried to mow parts that had hidden things in the grass that sheared my belts a time or two. Such a pain as I don’t have a way to get it to repair 😦 Thank you on the photo, I waited until I was sure their little bodies were frozen before getting close to it.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Reena Saxena says:

    You bring the scene alive with your words.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Reena, thank you. It was a heart racing few minutes I will tell you that much.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Bill says:

    One must indeed be cautious when one intrudes upon normal nature. The last time I saw one of these it was up in a tree and abandon, of course. But it scared so many they took it down
    A very enjoyable read, Lisa.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Bill, thank you. When they are bustling with activity yes you don’t want to antagonize the nest makers. I’ve seen more in the last year than ever before! Most of the time they are high up.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Bill says:

        When I lived in Oklahoma, I discovered bees nesting below ground–hard to see. But they go so upset when you mow over them. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  22. That is really huge and thank god it was empty!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Punam, I made sure we’d had a few freezes before trying to get close to it.

      Like

    2. msjadeli says:

      p.s. It was empty here, but it was definitely not when I was under it on the mower.

      Like

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