dVerse — OLN 322 — double tanka prose

resized larch tree in bloom so pretty 080322

Last year, after careful research, planning, acquisition, and planting, the larch tree settled into its space in the back yard next to the ginkgo. Both trees were given extra water until fall. It kept the larch stress-free and made a big difference in the growth of the ginkgo this year. Both trees have been lush since sprouting their leaves.

A few weeks ago, I took a stroll around the yard to snap pictures. Imagine my surprise and delight when I found a blossom on the larch tree. With all of the research, etc. I did on them, nowhere did I see blossoming mentioned.

Nature finds a way
to keep experience fresh
with new surprises;
each day gives gifts to enjoy
if we make time to notice.

resized prickly pear cactus 080322

I remember the first time I saw prickly pear cactus growing in Michigan. It was south of here, near Douglas, at the old Felt Mansion, on a slope in front of the house, a little to the right. How could cactus be growing here? It made the property even more mysterious (it was reported to be haunted.) I went home and did my research. It wasn’t a wrinkle in the fabric of the universe; prickly pear is a native plant.

I’ve seen it since. Once out along a walkway at Hoffmaster State Park, high up on the dune. Another time in a front yard of a client whose house was in advanced disrepair; yet the prickly pear was plentiful and in profuse bloom. The client’s mother happily gave me a few blossoms with bulbs attached, which I unsuccessfully tried to sprout in water.

This spring when I went to claim a wetlands garden flat of plants won in a random contest, I saw prickly pear in gallon containers for sale for five dollars. How could this be? Of course I bought one and planted it in a dry, sandy spot at the north end of the house. It has settled in and has been nibbled some by a curious rodent but is thriving.

Out of element;
a deserter paddles near
water; strands on sand,
it lives well in its extremes
but prefers sunny.

Linda Lee Lyberg is today’s host for dVerse’ Open Link Night.

40 Comments Add yours

  1. You have such green fingers… great that your plants thrive.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      It’s a really green location so it’s easy for plants to thrive, even the ones you don’t want, like poison ivy!

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Gillena Cox says:

      Luv such surprises as your blooming Larch

      Thanks for dropping by my blog

      Much💛love

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Glenn A. Buttkus says:

    Wonderful haibuns, terrific tankas. Gardening can be so satisfying if you have the patience and the thumb for it. One3 feels connected to the earth with the hands and heart in the soil.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks much, Glenn, and yes, the circuit is completed that way ❤

      Like

      1. I love to see things that ‘aren’t supposed to be”. Love these poems.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. msjadeli says:

          Mary, I like the way you put that. Thanks much.

          Like

  3. a blossom blew in to your larch – and what a nice surprise.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Love these two poems, especially together!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Linda, thank you very much ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Kerfe says:

    What a wonderful tour through your garden Jade! I did know that about prickly pear, but I can’t remember how. But yes, nature is generous with surprises–always a new delight to discover.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glad you enjoyed it, Kerfe. You may remember when I posted about it before.

      Like

  6. Helen says:

    How wonderful is your Haibun!! And a Tanka to end things!! I have a green thumb I think, but my garden grows inside. Townhouse living has its disadvantages. Cheers, Lisa .. I love this.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Helen, I remember your Christmas cactus and know you have a green thumb. There is healing in watching things grow, I think. Thanks much ❤

      Like

  7. One doesn’t have to be a tree-hugger (though I don’t mind folks hugging trees) to appreciate nature. But it probably true I take it for granted too often and should be a better observer!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      No more to be said. You said it all there 🙂

      Like

    2. msjadeli says:

      p.s. except thank you for reading 🙂

      Like

  8. Sadje says:

    Nature has the ability to surprise us! 💜👍🏼

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      On an ongoing basis!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Maybe nature understands what it takes to get some good pictures and poems written about it! 😆I enjoy your green posts! 💚

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Brendan says:

    The weave of prose and verse and photos makes you backyard garden an Eden.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Brendan, it surely feels that way. After living in the city up until 2011, it took a bit to adjust to being in Eden.

      Like

  11. Badfinger (Max) says:

    I’ve never seen them in the wild before…just in people’s houses…I’ve always been intrigued by them since watching Roadrunner as a kid and seeing those cactus in the desert.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      If you ever visit Michigan, I’ll take you to where they grow.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Badfinger (Max) says:

        That is a deal.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Dale says:

    How wonderful is all of this? Very, I say!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. lifelessons says:

    This is exactly how I feel every day when I walk out and see a new flower that has opened or a plant I’ve overlooked in the past. New world every day.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. What a gift!!! Nice 👍🏾

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Many thanks, Cindy 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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