Quote of the Day 012223 — C.S.Lewis

C. S. Lewis
link goes to image and also has interesting into on C.S. Lewis

“And out of that hopeless attempt has come nearly all that we call human history — money, poverty, ambition, war, prostitution, classes, empires, slavery — the long terrible story of man trying to find something other than God which will make him happy.” – C.S. Lewis

I’ve started playing an app on my phone called Cryptograms, where I guess by deduction what a quote is.  They’ve had some good ones in there.  Today’s inspired me to share it, and to add a new feature “Quote of the Day” to the blog.  Not sure if it will be regularly scheduled or just when I come across a good one.

Please feel free to share your thoughts on the quote or add your own “quote of the day” in the comments section.

36 Comments Add yours

  1. Justawriter says:

    Very true. Everything else leads you on an endless quest for meaning and satisfaction, making you want more and more.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Glad you agree and thanks for sharing your thoughts on it.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Badfinger (Max) says:

    Wonderful quote Lisa and sad but so true. I see it happening every day with executives.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      It is unfortunate and racing headlong into a dead end that may end up ending us all 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Badfinger (Max) says:

        Yea the world is too fast and too greedy now.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Marleen says:

    I love the quote. Additionally, it is certainly reminiscent of concepts in The Lord of the Rings.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marleen says:

      Oops, sorry… messed that up. Still, maybe not too mixed up. [C.S. Lewis had been an atheist before Tolkien especially et al were his peers and before he wrote what I enjoyed as a youngster, The Chronicles of Narnia.] I did mean to refer to John Ronald Reuel T’s famous work, yet wasn’t being very verbal.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. msjadeli says:

        Oh ok, I think I get what you’re saying. Do you think Tolkien helped Lewis change his perspective with his series?

        Like

        1. Marleen says:

          I think Lewis probably wouldn’t have written his own famous series, the set I read. Nor would he have thought quite the same way generally. However, Lewis was already very creative. I’ve found his ideas on Boxen (a place he made up in childhood) a bit intriguing. Tolkien didn’t especially like Lewis’ stories (with allegories like in The Chronicles), though. Anyway, I wanted to find out who started their successful works first (and maybe did influence the other imaginatively) so did some further looking around; saved this and a few other things for future reference a few days ago…

          https://www.heritage.org/civil-society/commentary/how-c-s-lewis-accepted-christianity

          On September 19, 1931, in what might rank as one of the most important conversations in literary history, Lewis took his friend and colleague J. R. R. Tolkien on a walk along the River Cherwell near Magdalen College. A professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford, Tolkien had been studying ancient and medieval mythologies for decades; he had begun writing his own epic mythology about Middle-earth while he was a soldier in France during World War I. As Lewis recounted the conversation in his autobiography, Surprised by Joy, Tolkien insisted that myths were not falsehoods but rather intimations of a concrete, spiritual reality.

          Note: I also learned that Magdalen, above, is pronounced as maudlin.

          I liked this answer better than the “best answer” at the [trademarked] Answers app [where I could have mistakenly believed the real answer I was looking for was that The Lion… Wardrobe was first]. I should admit I may have gotten this from a different very specific search.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. msjadeli says:

            Marleen, thank you for researching and sharing your research on it. Both of these guys were sharp cookies that gleaned from their pasts and paved the way to a more enlightened future. I absolutely agree with what Tolkien insisted. I’m reading a really good book about dreams, “The Oracle of Night,” by a scholar-scientist named Ribeiro, and love how he goes way way way back and steps it forward in how dreams have influenced so much. I’m only on page 60 right now but the groundwork he lays is meticulous.

            Like

            1. Marleen says:

              🙂.

              Liked by 1 person

    2. msjadeli says:

      That’s interesting, Marleen, hadn’t looked at it in that light.

      Like

  4. Carol anne says:

    good one Li! I love collecting quotes!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Carol Anne. Are you going to add this one to your collection?

      Like

  5. I go to an Inklings meeting on Zoom every Friday, and once a month on Zoom with the New York C.S. Lewis Society. These kinds of posts are interesting for me~

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I don’t know what Inklings is? Neat that you belong to a C.S. Lewis Society group. Happy you found the post interesting because of Lewis.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Fascinating. I do believe that having a writing group where you could count on your friends to be brutally (and honestly) honest would definitely hone your work.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. We don’t write there. We learn about those writers but I assume it helps my writing

            Liked by 1 person

        2. msjadeli says:

          p.s. So you are in a writing group like this? Very cool.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I learn a lot of really interesting things. I took a lot of literature classes in school but there is much more I never learned there

            Liked by 1 person

    2. msjadeli says:

      p.s. Please feel free to share a favorite Lewis quote of yours.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’ll try to find a really interesting one

        Liked by 1 person

  6. It’s a pretty profound quote, Lisa. And it rings true. Unfortunately, human beings can be very short-sighted and very cruel when it comes to the pursuit of happiness!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      I think lack of spirituality leaves a vacuum that can never be filled 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Sadje says:

    It’s a good quote Li. Thanks for sharing

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      You’re welcome, Sadje.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        ❤️❤️❤️

        Liked by 1 person

  8. memadtwo says:

    Does God make people happy? Not in my experience…(K)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      It’s all in the definitions. A boxed god (organized religion) can do just the opposite. And happy means something different to each individual.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. memadtwo says:

        I just discussed that with a friend. We decided that happy has become a meaningless word, settling on contentment as a better alternative.

        And, well, God is another loaded word.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Marleen says:

          I think contentment is better, too. And I’d prefer not to look for happiness rather than be satisfied with Truth.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. msjadeli says:

            Truth is another one of those twisty biscuit words. Truth is relative. There is no view without a viewer.

            Like

            1. Marleen says:

              🙂I was mostly just using instead of the word God.

              Liked by 1 person

      2. Marleen says:

        A boxed …organized religion… can do just the opposite.

        Liked by 1 person

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