#FF — Breathe


PHOTO PROMPT © J Hardy Carroll

Breathe

The schedule rested on the ledge at the guard shack. Electric devices long gone, the only way to make an appointment was to physically make one in the book.

Reservations were out weeks; visitors felt blessed it wasn’t months. Dome Association sites each had rustic campsites for waiters. Township halls’ soup kitchens fed the masses.

Rose and her family were next. The door whooshed open and soon they were breathing fresh air. The last surviving leafy plants, all now protected in domes, quietly gave color to their cheeks, if only for an hour. Baby Pip moved his limbs and smiled.

[100 words]

The adventurous Rochelle Wisoff-Fields is the host of Friday Fictioneers.

48 Comments Add yours

  1. Which one of the plants is Baby Pip?

    Liked by 1 person

      1. msjadeli says:

        🙂 Thanks and I love that sunflower!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Jim, I deleted “no comment” and am adding this one. With Baby Pip’s limbs, I can see why you thought he was a plant. He’s a human baby that is slowly dying because he has no fresh air to breathe. When he gets fresh air in the dome he is revived. Hope that answers your question.

      Like

  2. Nobbinmaug says:

    “Feed me, Seymore.” I like the added twist to the preservation of plant life. I’m assuming Baby Pip isn’t a quadriplegic who regains the ability to move his limbs in the presence of plants. That would be a tragic twist. I’m imagining a more sinister twist.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      When the plants die, we die, so there is method to the madness. Baby Pip is languishing outside of the dome. Think Tiny Tim. You imagined right.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. neilmacdon says:

    At least everyone gets a fair turn

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      The rich have domes they live in 24/7, so yes and no…

      Liked by 1 person

  4. This is a really dystopian view…. though I wonder how long we would last outside the dome.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Iain Kelly says:

    I wonder if this experience and opportunity is rationed out equally to all, or I suspect not…

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Dale says:

    One tiny sip or the masses, one giant gulp for the top echelons, eh?

    Liked by 1 person

  7. a dystopian world narrated with much mystery and intrigues me to step out and breathe in more of its story -so well written!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for your wonderful comment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. my pleasure, your stories take me to many wonderful places.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Sadje says:

    Great imaginative story.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Sadje.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        You’re welcome Li.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. A grim future, hopefully avoidable. The Des Moines Botanical Garden is a wonderful place to go on a frozen day like today.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Sandra says:

    That was such a scary, and yet not impossible scenario. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks for reading and your comments, Sandra.

      Like

  11. pennygadd51 says:

    At first I thought people were queuing to live in the dome, but I guess they were actually taking very short vacations.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      They were being given a chance to breathe fresh air for an hour every couple of weeks.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Dear Lisa,

    A world no one wants to live in, yet with auto emissions and plastics we’re closer and closer to it. Imaginative story.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Rochelle.
      Shalom,
      Lisa

      Like

  13. plaridel says:

    i’m hoping against hope that it won’t come to this. but the future looks bleak.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. granonine says:

    The stories seem to be going back and forth between doomsday end-of-the-world and sci-fi this week. I read through the comments here, and was enlightened. I’d seen it a bit differently 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you Linda. I’d be interested in hearing how you saw it? Also, yes, the photo did seem to generate a lot of those types of stories!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. granonine says:

        Baby Pip seems to be the point of question. I immediately saw him as a meat-eating plant looking forward to his next snack. Others saw him as a human baby enjoying his taste of fresh air outside the dome. That smile at the end had a sinister feel for me, but then in a comment you said “Think Tiny Tim,” and there was certainly nothing sinister about him.

        Open to interpretation, right? Which is one of the things I truly love about these 100-word novels we write each week 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. msjadeli says:

          Linda, you know I’ve gone dark a time or two, so having a dark spin on it wouldn’t be unusual. It may very well be exactly as you say. I just netted the story and wrote it down. You are exactly right on your last paragraph. One of the reasons I love Friday Fictioneers also ❤

          Liked by 1 person

  15. draliman says:

    Nice of the rich people to let the commoners have a quick go.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Is this the future? A thought-provoking piece.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Good question, Keith, thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Lynn Love says:

    A chilling vision of a future I hope we manage to avoid. Well written

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you, Lynn, and yes, I hope it never comes to pass.

      Like

  18. James McEwan says:

    What of baby Pip, what future will there be? You paint a rather dystopian scenario. lets plan ahead if only for little pip.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Yes, James. A very kind-hearted comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. GHLearner says:

    A very bleak look into the future. I had no doubts that the baby was human and enjoyed the fresh air. I think the very young and the very old are the ones most affected by bad air quality.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. magarisa says:

    A dystopian future with a hint of hope.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thank you for reading and your comment, Magarisa.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. magarisa says:

        My pleasure, Li.

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Laurie Bell says:

    Oh this is clever.
    Fresh clean air inside the dome. No wonder the wait list has blown out!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. parkermccoy says:

    Very cool story! A bit bleak but with a little silver lining at the end. Hopefully reality doesn’t come to this. Ha…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. msjadeli says:

      Thanks, Parker. I hope it doesn’t either. When I see what’s happening in Australia, I have to wonder…

      Liked by 1 person

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